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Preventing diverticular disease. Review of recent evidence on high-fibre diets.
Can Fam Physician. 2002 Oct; 48:1632-7.CF

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To review recent evidence on dietary factors associated with diverticular disease (DD) with special emphasis on dietary fibre.

QUALITY OF EVIDENCE

MEDLINE was searched from January 1966 to December 2001 for articles on the relationship between dietary and other lifestyle factors and DD. Most articles either focused on dietary intervention in treating symptomatic DD or were case-control studies with inherent limitations for studying diet-disease associations. Only one large prospective study of male health professionals in the United States assessed diet at baseline and before initial diagnosis of DD.

MAIN MESSAGE

A diet high in fibre mainly from fruits and vegetables and low in total fat and red meat decreases risk of DD. Evidence indicates that the insoluble component of fibre is strongly associated with lower risk of DD; this association was particularly strong for cellulose. Caffeine and alcohol do not substantially increase risk of DD, nor does obesity, but higher levels of physical activity seem to reduce risk of DD.

CONCLUSION

A diet high in fibre and low in total fat and red meat and a lifestyle with more physical activity might help prevent DD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nutritionals at Whitehall-Robins Inc, Mississauga, Ont. harsh@durham.netNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12449547

Citation

Aldoori, Walid, and Milly Ryan-Harshman. "Preventing Diverticular Disease. Review of Recent Evidence On High-fibre Diets." Canadian Family Physician Medecin De Famille Canadien, vol. 48, 2002, pp. 1632-7.
Aldoori W, Ryan-Harshman M. Preventing diverticular disease. Review of recent evidence on high-fibre diets. Can Fam Physician. 2002;48:1632-7.
Aldoori, W., & Ryan-Harshman, M. (2002). Preventing diverticular disease. Review of recent evidence on high-fibre diets. Canadian Family Physician Medecin De Famille Canadien, 48, 1632-7.
Aldoori W, Ryan-Harshman M. Preventing Diverticular Disease. Review of Recent Evidence On High-fibre Diets. Can Fam Physician. 2002;48:1632-7. PubMed PMID: 12449547.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preventing diverticular disease. Review of recent evidence on high-fibre diets. AU - Aldoori,Walid, AU - Ryan-Harshman,Milly, PY - 2002/11/27/pubmed PY - 2002/12/12/medline PY - 2002/11/27/entrez SP - 1632 EP - 7 JF - Canadian family physician Medecin de famille canadien JO - Can Fam Physician VL - 48 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To review recent evidence on dietary factors associated with diverticular disease (DD) with special emphasis on dietary fibre. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE was searched from January 1966 to December 2001 for articles on the relationship between dietary and other lifestyle factors and DD. Most articles either focused on dietary intervention in treating symptomatic DD or were case-control studies with inherent limitations for studying diet-disease associations. Only one large prospective study of male health professionals in the United States assessed diet at baseline and before initial diagnosis of DD. MAIN MESSAGE: A diet high in fibre mainly from fruits and vegetables and low in total fat and red meat decreases risk of DD. Evidence indicates that the insoluble component of fibre is strongly associated with lower risk of DD; this association was particularly strong for cellulose. Caffeine and alcohol do not substantially increase risk of DD, nor does obesity, but higher levels of physical activity seem to reduce risk of DD. CONCLUSION: A diet high in fibre and low in total fat and red meat and a lifestyle with more physical activity might help prevent DD. SN - 0008-350X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12449547/Preventing_diverticular_disease__Review_of_recent_evidence_on_high_fibre_diets_ L2 - http://www.cfp.ca/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=12449547 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -