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Dietary factors associated with the risk of high iron stores in the elderly Framingham Heart Study cohort.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

High body iron stores may increase the risk of several chronic diseases. Whether dietary factors contribute to the risk of high iron stores is unknown.

OBJECTIVE

We assessed the relation between dietary factors and the risk of high iron stores in the elderly Framingham Heart Study cohort.

DESIGN

We examined the relation between the usual intake of dietary factors (food-frequency questionnaire) and the risk of high iron stores (serum ferritin >300 and 200 micro g/L in men and women, respectively) in 614 subjects aged 68-93 y.

RESULTS

The risk of high iron stores was significantly higher 1) in subjects who took > or =30 mg supplemental Fe/d than in nonusers [odds ratio (OR): 4.32; 95% CI: 1.63, 11.47], 2) in subjects who consumed >21 servings of fruit/wk than in those who consumed < or =14 servings/wk (OR: 2.88; 95% CI: 1.26, 6.61), and 3) in subjects who consumed >4 but <7 or > or=7 servings of red meat/wk than in those who consumed < or =4 servings/wk (ORs: 2.94 and 3.61, respectively; 95% CIs: 1.33, 6.47 and 1.57, 8.27, respectively). Whole-grain intake (>7 servings/wk) was inversely associated (OR: 0.23; 95% CI: 0.07, 0.75).

CONCLUSIONS

Among elders, intakes of highly bioavailable forms of iron (supplemental iron and red meat) and of fruit, a dietary source of an enhancer of nonheme-iron absorption (vitamin C), promote high iron stores, whereas foods containing phytate (whole grains) decrease these stores. Individual dietary patterns may be important modulators of high iron stores.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Mineral Bioavailability Laboratory, Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111, USA.

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Aging
    Alcohol Drinking
    Animals
    Ascorbic Acid
    Biological Availability
    Body Mass Index
    Cohort Studies
    Diet
    Dietary Supplements
    Edible Grain
    Female
    Ferritins
    Fruit
    Heart Diseases
    Humans
    Iron
    Iron, Dietary
    Longitudinal Studies
    Male
    Massachusetts
    Meat
    Reference Values
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12450906

    Citation

    Fleming, Diana J., et al. "Dietary Factors Associated With the Risk of High Iron Stores in the Elderly Framingham Heart Study Cohort." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 76, no. 6, 2002, pp. 1375-84.
    Fleming DJ, Tucker KL, Jacques PF, et al. Dietary factors associated with the risk of high iron stores in the elderly Framingham Heart Study cohort. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002;76(6):1375-84.
    Fleming, D. J., Tucker, K. L., Jacques, P. F., Dallal, G. E., Wilson, P. W., & Wood, R. J. (2002). Dietary factors associated with the risk of high iron stores in the elderly Framingham Heart Study cohort. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 76(6), pp. 1375-84.
    Fleming DJ, et al. Dietary Factors Associated With the Risk of High Iron Stores in the Elderly Framingham Heart Study Cohort. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002;76(6):1375-84. PubMed PMID: 12450906.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary factors associated with the risk of high iron stores in the elderly Framingham Heart Study cohort. AU - Fleming,Diana J, AU - Tucker,Katherine L, AU - Jacques,Paul F, AU - Dallal,Gerard E, AU - Wilson,Peter W F, AU - Wood,Richard J, PY - 2002/11/27/pubmed PY - 2002/12/21/medline PY - 2002/11/27/entrez SP - 1375 EP - 84 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 76 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: High body iron stores may increase the risk of several chronic diseases. Whether dietary factors contribute to the risk of high iron stores is unknown. OBJECTIVE: We assessed the relation between dietary factors and the risk of high iron stores in the elderly Framingham Heart Study cohort. DESIGN: We examined the relation between the usual intake of dietary factors (food-frequency questionnaire) and the risk of high iron stores (serum ferritin >300 and 200 micro g/L in men and women, respectively) in 614 subjects aged 68-93 y. RESULTS: The risk of high iron stores was significantly higher 1) in subjects who took > or =30 mg supplemental Fe/d than in nonusers [odds ratio (OR): 4.32; 95% CI: 1.63, 11.47], 2) in subjects who consumed >21 servings of fruit/wk than in those who consumed < or =14 servings/wk (OR: 2.88; 95% CI: 1.26, 6.61), and 3) in subjects who consumed >4 but <7 or > or=7 servings of red meat/wk than in those who consumed < or =4 servings/wk (ORs: 2.94 and 3.61, respectively; 95% CIs: 1.33, 6.47 and 1.57, 8.27, respectively). Whole-grain intake (>7 servings/wk) was inversely associated (OR: 0.23; 95% CI: 0.07, 0.75). CONCLUSIONS: Among elders, intakes of highly bioavailable forms of iron (supplemental iron and red meat) and of fruit, a dietary source of an enhancer of nonheme-iron absorption (vitamin C), promote high iron stores, whereas foods containing phytate (whole grains) decrease these stores. Individual dietary patterns may be important modulators of high iron stores. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12450906/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/76.6.1375 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -