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Clinical Escherichia coli strains carrying stx genes: stx variants and stx-positive virulence profiles.
J Clin Microbiol. 2002 Dec; 40(12):4585-93.JC

Abstract

Altogether, 173 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotype O157 (n = 111) and non-O157 (n = 62) isolates from 170 subjects were screened by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism for eight different stx genes. The results were compiled according to serotypes, phage types of O157, production of Stx toxin and enterohemolysin, and the presence of eae. The stx genes occurred in 11 combinations; the most common were stx(2) with stx(2c) (42%), stx(2) alone (21%), and stx(1) alone (16%). Of the O157 strains, 64% carried stx(2) with stx(2c) versus 2% of the non-O157 strains (P < 0.001). In the non-O157 strains, the prevailing gene was stx(1) (99% versus 1% in O157 strains; P < 0.001). In addition, one strain (O Rough:H4:stx(2c)) which has not previously been described as associated with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) was found. Ten stx-positive virulence profiles were responsible for 71% of all STEC infections. Of these profiles, five accounted for 71% of the 21 strains isolated from 20 patients with HUS or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). The strains having the virulence profile that caused mainly HUS or TTP or bloody diarrhea produced Stx with titers of >/=1:128 (90%) more commonly than did other strains (51%; P < 0.001). These strains were also more commonly enterohemolytic (98% versus 68% for other strains; P < 0.001) and possessed the eae gene (100%) more commonly than did other strains (74%; P < 0.001). A particular virulence profile, O157:H7:PT2:stx(2):stx(2c):eae:Ehly, was significantly more frequently associated with HUS and bloody diarrhea than were other profiles (P = 0.02) and also caused the deaths of two children. In this study, the risk factors for severe symptoms were an age of <5 years and infection by the strain of O157:H7:PT2 mentioned above.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Enteric Pathogens, National Public Health Institute, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12454157

Citation

Eklund, Marjut, et al. "Clinical Escherichia Coli Strains Carrying Stx Genes: Stx Variants and Stx-positive Virulence Profiles." Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 40, no. 12, 2002, pp. 4585-93.
Eklund M, Leino K, Siitonen A. Clinical Escherichia coli strains carrying stx genes: stx variants and stx-positive virulence profiles. J Clin Microbiol. 2002;40(12):4585-93.
Eklund, M., Leino, K., & Siitonen, A. (2002). Clinical Escherichia coli strains carrying stx genes: stx variants and stx-positive virulence profiles. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 40(12), 4585-93.
Eklund M, Leino K, Siitonen A. Clinical Escherichia Coli Strains Carrying Stx Genes: Stx Variants and Stx-positive Virulence Profiles. J Clin Microbiol. 2002;40(12):4585-93. PubMed PMID: 12454157.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical Escherichia coli strains carrying stx genes: stx variants and stx-positive virulence profiles. AU - Eklund,Marjut, AU - Leino,Kirsikka, AU - Siitonen,Anja, PY - 2002/11/28/pubmed PY - 2003/2/26/medline PY - 2002/11/28/entrez SP - 4585 EP - 93 JF - Journal of clinical microbiology JO - J Clin Microbiol VL - 40 IS - 12 N2 - Altogether, 173 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotype O157 (n = 111) and non-O157 (n = 62) isolates from 170 subjects were screened by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism for eight different stx genes. The results were compiled according to serotypes, phage types of O157, production of Stx toxin and enterohemolysin, and the presence of eae. The stx genes occurred in 11 combinations; the most common were stx(2) with stx(2c) (42%), stx(2) alone (21%), and stx(1) alone (16%). Of the O157 strains, 64% carried stx(2) with stx(2c) versus 2% of the non-O157 strains (P < 0.001). In the non-O157 strains, the prevailing gene was stx(1) (99% versus 1% in O157 strains; P < 0.001). In addition, one strain (O Rough:H4:stx(2c)) which has not previously been described as associated with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) was found. Ten stx-positive virulence profiles were responsible for 71% of all STEC infections. Of these profiles, five accounted for 71% of the 21 strains isolated from 20 patients with HUS or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). The strains having the virulence profile that caused mainly HUS or TTP or bloody diarrhea produced Stx with titers of >/=1:128 (90%) more commonly than did other strains (51%; P < 0.001). These strains were also more commonly enterohemolytic (98% versus 68% for other strains; P < 0.001) and possessed the eae gene (100%) more commonly than did other strains (74%; P < 0.001). A particular virulence profile, O157:H7:PT2:stx(2):stx(2c):eae:Ehly, was significantly more frequently associated with HUS and bloody diarrhea than were other profiles (P = 0.02) and also caused the deaths of two children. In this study, the risk factors for severe symptoms were an age of <5 years and infection by the strain of O157:H7:PT2 mentioned above. SN - 0095-1137 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12454157/Clinical_Escherichia_coli_strains_carrying_stx_genes:_stx_variants_and_stx_positive_virulence_profiles_ L2 - http://jcm.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=12454157 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -