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Coffee intake is associated with lower risk of symptomatic gallstone disease in women.
Gastroenterology. 2002 Dec; 123(6):1823-30.G

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Metabolic studies have shown that coffee affects several hepatobiliary processes that are involved in cholesterol lithogenesis. We previously showed that coffee drinking was associated with a lower risk of symptomatic gallstone disease in men.

METHODS

We prospectively examined the association between coffee drinking and cholecystectomy, a surrogate of symptomatic gallstone disease, in a cohort of 80,898 women age 34-59 years in 1980 who had no history of gallstone disease. Coffee consumption and cholecystectomy were reported by participants on biennial mailed questionnaires.

RESULTS

During 20 years of follow-up to the year 2000, 7,811 women reported a cholecystectomy. Compared with women who consistently reported consuming no caffeinated coffee, the multivariate relative risks (adjusting for risk factors for gallstone disease) of cholecystectomy comparing increasing categories of consistent intake of caffeinated coffee (0, 1, 2-3, and > or =4 cups/day) were 1.0, 0.91, 0.78, and 0.72 (95% confidence interval comparing extreme categories, 0.62-0.84; P value of test for trend < 0.0001). Caffeine intake from beverages and dietary sources was also inversely associated with risk of cholecystectomy. The multivariate relative risks comparing increasing categories of caffeine intake (< or =25, 26-100, 101-200, 201-400, 401-800, and >800 mg/day) were 1.0, 1.03, 1.01, 0.94, 0.85, and 0.85 (95% confidence interval comparing extreme categories, 0.74-0.96; P value of test for trend < 0.0001). In contrast, decaffeinated coffee was not associated with risk.

CONCLUSIONS

These data suggest that consumption of caffeinated coffee may play a role in the prevention of symptomatic gallstone disease in women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12454839

Citation

Leitzmann, Michael F., et al. "Coffee Intake Is Associated With Lower Risk of Symptomatic Gallstone Disease in Women." Gastroenterology, vol. 123, no. 6, 2002, pp. 1823-30.
Leitzmann MF, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC, et al. Coffee intake is associated with lower risk of symptomatic gallstone disease in women. Gastroenterology. 2002;123(6):1823-30.
Leitzmann, M. F., Stampfer, M. J., Willett, W. C., Spiegelman, D., Colditz, G. A., & Giovannucci, E. L. (2002). Coffee intake is associated with lower risk of symptomatic gallstone disease in women. Gastroenterology, 123(6), 1823-30.
Leitzmann MF, et al. Coffee Intake Is Associated With Lower Risk of Symptomatic Gallstone Disease in Women. Gastroenterology. 2002;123(6):1823-30. PubMed PMID: 12454839.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee intake is associated with lower risk of symptomatic gallstone disease in women. AU - Leitzmann,Michael F, AU - Stampfer,Meir J, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Spiegelman,Donna, AU - Colditz,Graham A, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, PY - 2002/11/28/pubmed PY - 2002/12/28/medline PY - 2002/11/28/entrez SP - 1823 EP - 30 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 123 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Metabolic studies have shown that coffee affects several hepatobiliary processes that are involved in cholesterol lithogenesis. We previously showed that coffee drinking was associated with a lower risk of symptomatic gallstone disease in men. METHODS: We prospectively examined the association between coffee drinking and cholecystectomy, a surrogate of symptomatic gallstone disease, in a cohort of 80,898 women age 34-59 years in 1980 who had no history of gallstone disease. Coffee consumption and cholecystectomy were reported by participants on biennial mailed questionnaires. RESULTS: During 20 years of follow-up to the year 2000, 7,811 women reported a cholecystectomy. Compared with women who consistently reported consuming no caffeinated coffee, the multivariate relative risks (adjusting for risk factors for gallstone disease) of cholecystectomy comparing increasing categories of consistent intake of caffeinated coffee (0, 1, 2-3, and > or =4 cups/day) were 1.0, 0.91, 0.78, and 0.72 (95% confidence interval comparing extreme categories, 0.62-0.84; P value of test for trend < 0.0001). Caffeine intake from beverages and dietary sources was also inversely associated with risk of cholecystectomy. The multivariate relative risks comparing increasing categories of caffeine intake (< or =25, 26-100, 101-200, 201-400, 401-800, and >800 mg/day) were 1.0, 1.03, 1.01, 0.94, 0.85, and 0.85 (95% confidence interval comparing extreme categories, 0.74-0.96; P value of test for trend < 0.0001). In contrast, decaffeinated coffee was not associated with risk. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that consumption of caffeinated coffee may play a role in the prevention of symptomatic gallstone disease in women. SN - 0016-5085 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12454839/Coffee_intake_is_associated_with_lower_risk_of_symptomatic_gallstone_disease_in_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016508502004547 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -