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School climate, observed risky behaviors, and victimization as predictors of high school students' fear and judgments of school violence as a problem.
Health Educ Behav. 2002 Dec; 29(6):716-36.HE

Abstract

The primary aim of this study is to explore how school-related variables predict high school students' subjective judgements of school violence. Using a nationally representative sample (Israel) of 3,518 high school-aged youth, this study tested the hypotheses that (a) students' personal fear of attending school due to violence and (b) students' assessment of a school violence problem are best understood as separate conceptual constructs. The findings support the proposition that student fear of attending school and assessments of school violence as a problem are influenced by different types of school-related variables. Student fear of attending school due to violence was directly related to experiences of personal victimization by students and school staff. In contrast with fear, students'judgements of their schools' overall violence problem were directly associated with the variables of school climate, observed risk behaviors, and personal victimization. Implications for policy, theory, and future research are highlighted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Education and Social Work, University of Southern California 90089-0411, USA. rastor@usc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12456131

Citation

Astor, Ron Avi, et al. "School Climate, Observed Risky Behaviors, and Victimization as Predictors of High School Students' Fear and Judgments of School Violence as a Problem." Health Education & Behavior : the Official Publication of the Society for Public Health Education, vol. 29, no. 6, 2002, pp. 716-36.
Astor RA, Benbenishty R, Zeira A, et al. School climate, observed risky behaviors, and victimization as predictors of high school students' fear and judgments of school violence as a problem. Health Educ Behav. 2002;29(6):716-36.
Astor, R. A., Benbenishty, R., Zeira, A., & Vinokur, A. (2002). School climate, observed risky behaviors, and victimization as predictors of high school students' fear and judgments of school violence as a problem. Health Education & Behavior : the Official Publication of the Society for Public Health Education, 29(6), 716-36.
Astor RA, et al. School Climate, Observed Risky Behaviors, and Victimization as Predictors of High School Students' Fear and Judgments of School Violence as a Problem. Health Educ Behav. 2002;29(6):716-36. PubMed PMID: 12456131.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - School climate, observed risky behaviors, and victimization as predictors of high school students' fear and judgments of school violence as a problem. AU - Astor,Ron Avi, AU - Benbenishty,Rami, AU - Zeira,Anat, AU - Vinokur,Amiram, PY - 2002/11/29/pubmed PY - 2003/3/5/medline PY - 2002/11/29/entrez SP - 716 EP - 36 JF - Health education & behavior : the official publication of the Society for Public Health Education JO - Health Educ Behav VL - 29 IS - 6 N2 - The primary aim of this study is to explore how school-related variables predict high school students' subjective judgements of school violence. Using a nationally representative sample (Israel) of 3,518 high school-aged youth, this study tested the hypotheses that (a) students' personal fear of attending school due to violence and (b) students' assessment of a school violence problem are best understood as separate conceptual constructs. The findings support the proposition that student fear of attending school and assessments of school violence as a problem are influenced by different types of school-related variables. Student fear of attending school due to violence was directly related to experiences of personal victimization by students and school staff. In contrast with fear, students'judgements of their schools' overall violence problem were directly associated with the variables of school climate, observed risk behaviors, and personal victimization. Implications for policy, theory, and future research are highlighted. SN - 1090-1981 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12456131/School_climate_observed_risky_behaviors_and_victimization_as_predictors_of_high_school_students'_fear_and_judgments_of_school_violence_as_a_problem_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/109019802237940?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -