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Perinatal risk factors for schizophrenia: diagnostic specificity and relationships with maternal psychopathology.
Am J Med Genet 2002; 114(8):898-905AJ

Abstract

Although a growing body of evidence supports the hypothesis that exposure to obstetric complications (OCs) increases the vulnerability for schizophrenia, some questions remain unanswered regarding the diagnostic specificity and the etiological significance of this association. Associations with a history of OCs have been reported for other severe psychiatric disorders, such as autism, anorexia nervosa, or psychotic affective disorder. Thus, OCs may increase in a relatively non-specific way the vulnerability for a range of severe mental disorders, the expression of this vulnerability depending on the interaction between OCs and other risk factors, such as the genetic liability for specific psychiatric disorder, or exposure to later environmental risk factors. The causal pathway between OCs, maternal psychopathology, and psychotic outcome in the offspring is not fully elucidated. The directions of the associations are often bi-directional, and the mediating variables, if any, are not clearly identified. OCs may have a direct negative impact on fetal brain development, may be on the causal pathway between prepartum maternal depression/exposure to stress and increased risk of schizophrenia, or may indirectly increase the risk of child's later psychiatric disorder by acting as risk factors for maternal postpartum depression. The links and possible interactions between somatic perinatal risk factors and maternal psychopathology in the association with offspring's increased vulnerability for psychosis have to be further explored.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University Victor Segalen Bordeaux2, France. helene.verdoux@ipso.u-bordeaux2.frNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12457383

Citation

Verdoux, Hélène, and Anne-Laure Sutter. "Perinatal Risk Factors for Schizophrenia: Diagnostic Specificity and Relationships With Maternal Psychopathology." American Journal of Medical Genetics, vol. 114, no. 8, 2002, pp. 898-905.
Verdoux H, Sutter AL. Perinatal risk factors for schizophrenia: diagnostic specificity and relationships with maternal psychopathology. Am J Med Genet. 2002;114(8):898-905.
Verdoux, H., & Sutter, A. L. (2002). Perinatal risk factors for schizophrenia: diagnostic specificity and relationships with maternal psychopathology. American Journal of Medical Genetics, 114(8), pp. 898-905.
Verdoux H, Sutter AL. Perinatal Risk Factors for Schizophrenia: Diagnostic Specificity and Relationships With Maternal Psychopathology. Am J Med Genet. 2002 Dec 8;114(8):898-905. PubMed PMID: 12457383.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perinatal risk factors for schizophrenia: diagnostic specificity and relationships with maternal psychopathology. AU - Verdoux,Hélène, AU - Sutter,Anne-Laure, PY - 2002/11/29/pubmed PY - 2003/5/15/medline PY - 2002/11/29/entrez SP - 898 EP - 905 JF - American journal of medical genetics JO - Am. J. Med. Genet. VL - 114 IS - 8 N2 - Although a growing body of evidence supports the hypothesis that exposure to obstetric complications (OCs) increases the vulnerability for schizophrenia, some questions remain unanswered regarding the diagnostic specificity and the etiological significance of this association. Associations with a history of OCs have been reported for other severe psychiatric disorders, such as autism, anorexia nervosa, or psychotic affective disorder. Thus, OCs may increase in a relatively non-specific way the vulnerability for a range of severe mental disorders, the expression of this vulnerability depending on the interaction between OCs and other risk factors, such as the genetic liability for specific psychiatric disorder, or exposure to later environmental risk factors. The causal pathway between OCs, maternal psychopathology, and psychotic outcome in the offspring is not fully elucidated. The directions of the associations are often bi-directional, and the mediating variables, if any, are not clearly identified. OCs may have a direct negative impact on fetal brain development, may be on the causal pathway between prepartum maternal depression/exposure to stress and increased risk of schizophrenia, or may indirectly increase the risk of child's later psychiatric disorder by acting as risk factors for maternal postpartum depression. The links and possible interactions between somatic perinatal risk factors and maternal psychopathology in the association with offspring's increased vulnerability for psychosis have to be further explored. SN - 0148-7299 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12457383/Perinatal_risk_factors_for_schizophrenia:_diagnostic_specificity_and_relationships_with_maternal_psychopathology_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0148-7299&date=2002&volume=114&issue=8&spage=898 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -