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Maltreatment of primary school students by educational staff in Israel.
Child Abuse Negl. 2002 Dec; 26(12):1291-309.CA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This paper reports on the prevalence of emotional and physical maltreatment of students in primary schools by school staff in Israel. Victimization by staff was analyzed according to students' gender, age group (4th, 5th, and 6th grade), cultural group (Jewish-non-religious, Jewish-religious, and Arab schools), school characteristics (school size and class size), and by socio-economic status of the students' families.

METHOD

Data were obtained from a nationally representative sample of 5472 students in Grades 4-6 in 71 schools across Israel. The students completed questionnaires during class, which included a scale for reporting physical and psychological maltreatment by staff. Data on the socio-economic status of the families of the students in each school were also obtained.

RESULTS

Students reported generally high rates of maltreatment by staff members. Almost a third reported being emotionally maltreated by a staff member, and more than a fifth (22.2%) reported being a victim of at least one type of physical maltreatment. The most vulnerable groups for maltreatment were males, students in Arab schools, and students in schools with a high percentage of students from low-income and low-education families.

CONCLUSIONS

These high rates of primary school students' victimization by staff are unacceptable. We recommend educational campaigns among teachers, as well as allocating more resources to support staff in low socio-economic neighborhoods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Paul Baerwald School of Social Work, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12464302

Citation

Benbenishty, Rami, et al. "Maltreatment of Primary School Students By Educational Staff in Israel." Child Abuse & Neglect, vol. 26, no. 12, 2002, pp. 1291-309.
Benbenishty R, Zeira A, Astor RA, et al. Maltreatment of primary school students by educational staff in Israel. Child Abuse Negl. 2002;26(12):1291-309.
Benbenishty, R., Zeira, A., Astor, R. A., & Khoury-Kassabri, M. (2002). Maltreatment of primary school students by educational staff in Israel. Child Abuse & Neglect, 26(12), 1291-309.
Benbenishty R, et al. Maltreatment of Primary School Students By Educational Staff in Israel. Child Abuse Negl. 2002;26(12):1291-309. PubMed PMID: 12464302.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maltreatment of primary school students by educational staff in Israel. AU - Benbenishty,Rami, AU - Zeira,Anat, AU - Astor,Ron Avi, AU - Khoury-Kassabri,Mona, PY - 2002/12/5/pubmed PY - 2003/3/19/medline PY - 2002/12/5/entrez SP - 1291 EP - 309 JF - Child abuse & neglect JO - Child Abuse Negl VL - 26 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This paper reports on the prevalence of emotional and physical maltreatment of students in primary schools by school staff in Israel. Victimization by staff was analyzed according to students' gender, age group (4th, 5th, and 6th grade), cultural group (Jewish-non-religious, Jewish-religious, and Arab schools), school characteristics (school size and class size), and by socio-economic status of the students' families. METHOD: Data were obtained from a nationally representative sample of 5472 students in Grades 4-6 in 71 schools across Israel. The students completed questionnaires during class, which included a scale for reporting physical and psychological maltreatment by staff. Data on the socio-economic status of the families of the students in each school were also obtained. RESULTS: Students reported generally high rates of maltreatment by staff members. Almost a third reported being emotionally maltreated by a staff member, and more than a fifth (22.2%) reported being a victim of at least one type of physical maltreatment. The most vulnerable groups for maltreatment were males, students in Arab schools, and students in schools with a high percentage of students from low-income and low-education families. CONCLUSIONS: These high rates of primary school students' victimization by staff are unacceptable. We recommend educational campaigns among teachers, as well as allocating more resources to support staff in low socio-economic neighborhoods. SN - 0145-2134 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12464302/Maltreatment_of_primary_school_students_by_educational_staff_in_Israel_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0145213402004167 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -