Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Prospective evaluation of Candida species colonization in hospitalized cancer patients: impact on short-term survival in recipients of marrow transplantation and patients with hematological malignancies.
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2002 Dec; 30(12):931-5.BM

Abstract

Most hematogenous candidiasis originates from endogenous host flora. The impact of clinically prominent Candida colonization on short-term mortality (<or=14 weeks) was prospectively studied in 193 hospitalized patients from 1998 to 1999. Clinically prominent colonization included yeasts isolated from all sterile body sites and >50 colonies of Candida from non-sterile sites. Fourteen (7.1%) patients were granulocytopenic (ANC <or=100/microl). Nineteen (9.8%) had undergone marrow transplantation, 26 (13.5%) had a hematologic malignancy and 129 (66.5) had non-hematologic cancer. Candida isolates (216) were collected form 210 specimens. Fifty-three (27.5%) patients died; 25 (19.4%) with solid tumors, compared to 16 (61.5%) with hematological malignancy, and 11 (57.9%) BMT recipients (P < 0.001). No deaths were seen in patients with AIDS, and one (7.7%) in a patient with a benign condition (P < 0.001). Twenty-six (29.2%) patients with respiratory tract, 13 (23.2%) with gastrointestinal tract, and three (14.3%) with genitourinary tract colonization died. In patients with multiple-site colonization, mortality was significantly higher (45.5%) (P < 0.05). Mortality was higher in patients with C. glabrata (52.9%) and C. krusei (75%) colonization than with C. albicans (24.1%) (P < 0.025). This study shows that patients with hematologic cancer and recipients of marrow transplant with Candida colonization of multiple body sites, and colonization with C. glabata or C. krusei have poor survival.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Infectious Diseases Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), New York, NY, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12476287

Citation

Safdar, A, and D Armstrong. "Prospective Evaluation of Candida Species Colonization in Hospitalized Cancer Patients: Impact On Short-term Survival in Recipients of Marrow Transplantation and Patients With Hematological Malignancies." Bone Marrow Transplantation, vol. 30, no. 12, 2002, pp. 931-5.
Safdar A, Armstrong D. Prospective evaluation of Candida species colonization in hospitalized cancer patients: impact on short-term survival in recipients of marrow transplantation and patients with hematological malignancies. Bone Marrow Transplant. 2002;30(12):931-5.
Safdar, A., & Armstrong, D. (2002). Prospective evaluation of Candida species colonization in hospitalized cancer patients: impact on short-term survival in recipients of marrow transplantation and patients with hematological malignancies. Bone Marrow Transplantation, 30(12), 931-5.
Safdar A, Armstrong D. Prospective Evaluation of Candida Species Colonization in Hospitalized Cancer Patients: Impact On Short-term Survival in Recipients of Marrow Transplantation and Patients With Hematological Malignancies. Bone Marrow Transplant. 2002;30(12):931-5. PubMed PMID: 12476287.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective evaluation of Candida species colonization in hospitalized cancer patients: impact on short-term survival in recipients of marrow transplantation and patients with hematological malignancies. AU - Safdar,A, AU - Armstrong,D, PY - 2002/02/27/received PY - 2002/05/21/accepted PY - 2002/12/12/pubmed PY - 2003/8/2/medline PY - 2002/12/12/entrez SP - 931 EP - 5 JF - Bone marrow transplantation JO - Bone Marrow Transplant. VL - 30 IS - 12 N2 - Most hematogenous candidiasis originates from endogenous host flora. The impact of clinically prominent Candida colonization on short-term mortality (<or=14 weeks) was prospectively studied in 193 hospitalized patients from 1998 to 1999. Clinically prominent colonization included yeasts isolated from all sterile body sites and >50 colonies of Candida from non-sterile sites. Fourteen (7.1%) patients were granulocytopenic (ANC <or=100/microl). Nineteen (9.8%) had undergone marrow transplantation, 26 (13.5%) had a hematologic malignancy and 129 (66.5) had non-hematologic cancer. Candida isolates (216) were collected form 210 specimens. Fifty-three (27.5%) patients died; 25 (19.4%) with solid tumors, compared to 16 (61.5%) with hematological malignancy, and 11 (57.9%) BMT recipients (P < 0.001). No deaths were seen in patients with AIDS, and one (7.7%) in a patient with a benign condition (P < 0.001). Twenty-six (29.2%) patients with respiratory tract, 13 (23.2%) with gastrointestinal tract, and three (14.3%) with genitourinary tract colonization died. In patients with multiple-site colonization, mortality was significantly higher (45.5%) (P < 0.05). Mortality was higher in patients with C. glabrata (52.9%) and C. krusei (75%) colonization than with C. albicans (24.1%) (P < 0.025). This study shows that patients with hematologic cancer and recipients of marrow transplant with Candida colonization of multiple body sites, and colonization with C. glabata or C. krusei have poor survival. SN - 0268-3369 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12476287/Prospective_evaluation_of_Candida_species_colonization_in_hospitalized_cancer_patients:_impact_on_short_term_survival_in_recipients_of_marrow_transplantation_and_patients_with_hematological_malignancies_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bmt.1703732 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -