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Non-anemic iron depletion, oral iron supplementation and indices of copper status in college-aged females.
J Am Coll Nutr. 2002 Dec; 21(6):545-52.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Indices of copper status, specifically serum copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity, and iron status, including serum ferritin, transferrin receptors, hemoglobin and hematocrit, were studied in 27 college-aged females with adequate iron versus low iron stores.

METHODS

Serum copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity, serum ferritin, transferrin receptors, hemoglobin and hematocrit were studied in 15 females with non-anemic iron depletion before and after five weeks of iron supplementation and in 12 healthy iron-adequate females aged 19 to 28 years.

RESULTS

Mean hemoglobin, hematocrit and ferritin concentrations of the control group (144 +/- 11 g/L, 43 +/- 3% and 38 +/- 15 micro g/L, respectively) were significantly higher than those of the iron depleted group prior to supplementation (134 +/- 9 g/L, 39 +/- 2% and 11 +/- 6 micro g/L, respectively). The serum transferrin receptor to serum ferritin ratio was significantly greater for the iron depleted group prior to supplementation (890 +/- 753) versus the control group (151 +/- 61). Mean serum copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity of the iron-adequate control group (20.0 +/- 5.7 micro mol/L, 463 +/- 142 mg/L and 527 +/- 124 U/mL, respectively) were significantly higher than those of the iron depleted group (12.4 +/- 3.8 micro mol/L, 350 +/- 108 mg/L and 353 +/- 186 U/mL, respectively) prior to supplementation. Following iron supplementation, hematocrit and ferritin concentrations of the iron depleted group significantly increased to 42 +/- 3% and 26 +/- 8 micro g/L, respectively. Mean serum transferrin receptor concentrations and the serum transferrin receptor to ferritin ratios significantly decreased in the iron depleted group following supplementation (6.1 +/- 1.6 mg/L to 4.6 +/- 1.5 mg/L and 890 +/- 753 to 198 +/- 114, respectively). Iron supplementation also significantly increased the mean serum copper concentration to 14.2 +/- 5.4 micro mol/L and, in subjects with serum ferritin concentrations </=12 micro g/L, the mean serum ceruloplasmin concentration.

CONCLUSIONS

Non-anemic iron depletion characterized by low iron stores is associated with negative impacts on copper status. Iron supplements improved indices of iron status and serum copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations. Whether the diminished serum copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations and superoxide dismutase activity are associated with free radical damage to iron depleted cells requires further investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Auburn University, Alabama 36849, USA. sgropper@auburn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12480800

Citation

Gropper, Sareen S., et al. "Non-anemic Iron Depletion, Oral Iron Supplementation and Indices of Copper Status in College-aged Females." Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 21, no. 6, 2002, pp. 545-52.
Gropper SS, Bader-Crowe DM, McAnulty LS, et al. Non-anemic iron depletion, oral iron supplementation and indices of copper status in college-aged females. J Am Coll Nutr. 2002;21(6):545-52.
Gropper, S. S., Bader-Crowe, D. M., McAnulty, L. S., White, B. D., & Keith, R. E. (2002). Non-anemic iron depletion, oral iron supplementation and indices of copper status in college-aged females. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 21(6), 545-52.
Gropper SS, et al. Non-anemic Iron Depletion, Oral Iron Supplementation and Indices of Copper Status in College-aged Females. J Am Coll Nutr. 2002;21(6):545-52. PubMed PMID: 12480800.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Non-anemic iron depletion, oral iron supplementation and indices of copper status in college-aged females. AU - Gropper,Sareen S, AU - Bader-Crowe,D Michele, AU - McAnulty,Lisa S, AU - White,B Douglas, AU - Keith,Robert E, PY - 2002/12/14/pubmed PY - 2003/5/7/medline PY - 2002/12/14/entrez SP - 545 EP - 52 JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition JO - J Am Coll Nutr VL - 21 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Indices of copper status, specifically serum copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity, and iron status, including serum ferritin, transferrin receptors, hemoglobin and hematocrit, were studied in 27 college-aged females with adequate iron versus low iron stores. METHODS: Serum copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity, serum ferritin, transferrin receptors, hemoglobin and hematocrit were studied in 15 females with non-anemic iron depletion before and after five weeks of iron supplementation and in 12 healthy iron-adequate females aged 19 to 28 years. RESULTS: Mean hemoglobin, hematocrit and ferritin concentrations of the control group (144 +/- 11 g/L, 43 +/- 3% and 38 +/- 15 micro g/L, respectively) were significantly higher than those of the iron depleted group prior to supplementation (134 +/- 9 g/L, 39 +/- 2% and 11 +/- 6 micro g/L, respectively). The serum transferrin receptor to serum ferritin ratio was significantly greater for the iron depleted group prior to supplementation (890 +/- 753) versus the control group (151 +/- 61). Mean serum copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity of the iron-adequate control group (20.0 +/- 5.7 micro mol/L, 463 +/- 142 mg/L and 527 +/- 124 U/mL, respectively) were significantly higher than those of the iron depleted group (12.4 +/- 3.8 micro mol/L, 350 +/- 108 mg/L and 353 +/- 186 U/mL, respectively) prior to supplementation. Following iron supplementation, hematocrit and ferritin concentrations of the iron depleted group significantly increased to 42 +/- 3% and 26 +/- 8 micro g/L, respectively. Mean serum transferrin receptor concentrations and the serum transferrin receptor to ferritin ratios significantly decreased in the iron depleted group following supplementation (6.1 +/- 1.6 mg/L to 4.6 +/- 1.5 mg/L and 890 +/- 753 to 198 +/- 114, respectively). Iron supplementation also significantly increased the mean serum copper concentration to 14.2 +/- 5.4 micro mol/L and, in subjects with serum ferritin concentrations </=12 micro g/L, the mean serum ceruloplasmin concentration. CONCLUSIONS: Non-anemic iron depletion characterized by low iron stores is associated with negative impacts on copper status. Iron supplements improved indices of iron status and serum copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations. Whether the diminished serum copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations and superoxide dismutase activity are associated with free radical damage to iron depleted cells requires further investigation. SN - 0731-5724 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12480800/Non_anemic_iron_depletion_oral_iron_supplementation_and_indices_of_copper_status_in_college_aged_females_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.2002.10719253 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -