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Abdominal obesity and ethnic differences in diabetes awareness, treatment, and glycemic control.
Obes Res. 2002 Dec; 10(12):1241-50.OR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare racial/ethnic differences in diabetes awareness, treatment, and glycemic control between non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic Americans. We also determined the impact of abdominal obesity on racial/ethnic differences in diabetes awareness, treatment, and glycemic control between these population groups.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES

Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) data were utilized for this study. Diabetes awareness was defined as acknowledging diabetic status. Diabetes treatment was defined as current use of anti-diabetic medications, good glycemic control as HbA(1c) < 8%, and abdominal obesity as waist circumference larger than expected. The impacts of abdominal obesity on racial/ethnic differences in diabetes awareness, treatment, and glycemic control were assessed using logistic regression analyses. Adjustments were made for age, education, smoking, alcohol intake, and health insurance.

RESULTS

Rates of diabetes awareness in whites, blacks, and Hispanics suffering from abdominal obesity were approximately 74%, 30%, and 21% in men and 77%, 32%, and 19% in women, respectively. Rates of diabetes treatment were 70%, 23%, and 14% in men and 57%, 45%, and 23% in women, respectively. In men, rates of glycemic control were 64%, 40%, and 30%, and in women, they were 62%, 51%, and 27%, respectively. Abdominal obesity was associated with decreased diabetes awareness and glycemic control in women.

DISCUSSION

Subjects with abdominal obesity were found to have poorer glycemic controls compared to those without abdominal obesity. Because diabetes prevalences were partially explained by racial/ethnic differences in diabetes awareness, treatment, and glycemic control, there is a need to craft diabetes awareness, treatment, and control programs along racial/ethnic origins.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Medicine, Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, Georgia 31207, USA. okosun_i@mercer.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12490668

Citation

Okosun, Ike S., and G E Alan Dever. "Abdominal Obesity and Ethnic Differences in Diabetes Awareness, Treatment, and Glycemic Control." Obesity Research, vol. 10, no. 12, 2002, pp. 1241-50.
Okosun IS, Dever GE. Abdominal obesity and ethnic differences in diabetes awareness, treatment, and glycemic control. Obes Res. 2002;10(12):1241-50.
Okosun, I. S., & Dever, G. E. (2002). Abdominal obesity and ethnic differences in diabetes awareness, treatment, and glycemic control. Obesity Research, 10(12), 1241-50.
Okosun IS, Dever GE. Abdominal Obesity and Ethnic Differences in Diabetes Awareness, Treatment, and Glycemic Control. Obes Res. 2002;10(12):1241-50. PubMed PMID: 12490668.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Abdominal obesity and ethnic differences in diabetes awareness, treatment, and glycemic control. AU - Okosun,Ike S, AU - Dever,G E Alan, PY - 2002/12/20/pubmed PY - 2003/6/7/medline PY - 2002/12/20/entrez SP - 1241 EP - 50 JF - Obesity research JO - Obes Res VL - 10 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare racial/ethnic differences in diabetes awareness, treatment, and glycemic control between non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic Americans. We also determined the impact of abdominal obesity on racial/ethnic differences in diabetes awareness, treatment, and glycemic control between these population groups. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) data were utilized for this study. Diabetes awareness was defined as acknowledging diabetic status. Diabetes treatment was defined as current use of anti-diabetic medications, good glycemic control as HbA(1c) < 8%, and abdominal obesity as waist circumference larger than expected. The impacts of abdominal obesity on racial/ethnic differences in diabetes awareness, treatment, and glycemic control were assessed using logistic regression analyses. Adjustments were made for age, education, smoking, alcohol intake, and health insurance. RESULTS: Rates of diabetes awareness in whites, blacks, and Hispanics suffering from abdominal obesity were approximately 74%, 30%, and 21% in men and 77%, 32%, and 19% in women, respectively. Rates of diabetes treatment were 70%, 23%, and 14% in men and 57%, 45%, and 23% in women, respectively. In men, rates of glycemic control were 64%, 40%, and 30%, and in women, they were 62%, 51%, and 27%, respectively. Abdominal obesity was associated with decreased diabetes awareness and glycemic control in women. DISCUSSION: Subjects with abdominal obesity were found to have poorer glycemic controls compared to those without abdominal obesity. Because diabetes prevalences were partially explained by racial/ethnic differences in diabetes awareness, treatment, and glycemic control, there is a need to craft diabetes awareness, treatment, and control programs along racial/ethnic origins. SN - 1071-7323 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12490668/Abdominal_obesity_and_ethnic_differences_in_diabetes_awareness_treatment_and_glycemic_control_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2002.169 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -