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The relationship of physical activity and body weight with all-cause mortality: results from the Puerto Rico Heart Health Program.
Ann Epidemiol 2002; 12(8):543-52AE

Abstract

PURPOSE

To study the relationship of physical activity and obesity with all-cause mortality in Puerto Rican Men.

METHODS

The Puerto Rico Heart Health Program collected physical activity and anthropometric measurements in 9,824 men between 1962 and 1965. After excluding those with known coronary heart disease at baseline, and those who died within the first three years of the study we analyzed the data for the relationship between physical activity and overweight status to all-cause mortality in 9,136 men. We stratified our participants by quartiles of physical activity. Participants were classified into four categories of body weight: underweight (BMI < 18.5), healthy weight (BMI =18.5-24.9), overweight (BMI = 25-29.9), and obese (BMI = 30+).

RESULTS

After adjusting for age, education, smoking status, hypertension status, hypercholesterolemic status, urban/rural residence, and overweight status, physical activity was independently related to all-cause mortality. All-cause mortality was lower in those in quartile 2 (OR = 0.68, CI = 0.58-0.79) than quartile 1 (reference, sedentary group). Mortality among those in quartile 3 and 4 (0.63, CI = 0.54-0.75; and 0.55, CI = 0.46-0.65, respectively) were also significantly lower than those observed in quartile 1, but not significantly lower than those observed in quartile 2. Furthermore, within every category of body weight, those who were most active had significantly lower odds ratio of all-cause mortality.

CONCLUSION

Our findings support the current recommendation that some physical activity is better than none, in protecting against all-cause mortality. The benefits of an active lifestyle are independent of body weight and that overweight and obese Puerto Rican men who are physically active experienced significant reductions in all-cause mortality compared with their sedentary counterparts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA. ccrespo@buffalo.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12495827

Citation

Crespo, Carlos J., et al. "The Relationship of Physical Activity and Body Weight With All-cause Mortality: Results From the Puerto Rico Heart Health Program." Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 12, no. 8, 2002, pp. 543-52.
Crespo CJ, Palmieri MR, Perdomo RP, et al. The relationship of physical activity and body weight with all-cause mortality: results from the Puerto Rico Heart Health Program. Ann Epidemiol. 2002;12(8):543-52.
Crespo, C. J., Palmieri, M. R., Perdomo, R. P., Mcgee, D. L., Smit, E., Sempos, C. T., ... Sorlie, P. D. (2002). The relationship of physical activity and body weight with all-cause mortality: results from the Puerto Rico Heart Health Program. Annals of Epidemiology, 12(8), pp. 543-52.
Crespo CJ, et al. The Relationship of Physical Activity and Body Weight With All-cause Mortality: Results From the Puerto Rico Heart Health Program. Ann Epidemiol. 2002;12(8):543-52. PubMed PMID: 12495827.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship of physical activity and body weight with all-cause mortality: results from the Puerto Rico Heart Health Program. AU - Crespo,Carlos J, AU - Palmieri,Mario R Garcia, AU - Perdomo,Rosa Perez, AU - Mcgee,Daniel L, AU - Smit,Ellen, AU - Sempos,Christopher T, AU - Lee,I-Min, AU - Sorlie,Paul D, PY - 2002/12/24/pubmed PY - 2003/3/4/medline PY - 2002/12/24/entrez SP - 543 EP - 52 JF - Annals of epidemiology JO - Ann Epidemiol VL - 12 IS - 8 N2 - PURPOSE: To study the relationship of physical activity and obesity with all-cause mortality in Puerto Rican Men. METHODS: The Puerto Rico Heart Health Program collected physical activity and anthropometric measurements in 9,824 men between 1962 and 1965. After excluding those with known coronary heart disease at baseline, and those who died within the first three years of the study we analyzed the data for the relationship between physical activity and overweight status to all-cause mortality in 9,136 men. We stratified our participants by quartiles of physical activity. Participants were classified into four categories of body weight: underweight (BMI < 18.5), healthy weight (BMI =18.5-24.9), overweight (BMI = 25-29.9), and obese (BMI = 30+). RESULTS: After adjusting for age, education, smoking status, hypertension status, hypercholesterolemic status, urban/rural residence, and overweight status, physical activity was independently related to all-cause mortality. All-cause mortality was lower in those in quartile 2 (OR = 0.68, CI = 0.58-0.79) than quartile 1 (reference, sedentary group). Mortality among those in quartile 3 and 4 (0.63, CI = 0.54-0.75; and 0.55, CI = 0.46-0.65, respectively) were also significantly lower than those observed in quartile 1, but not significantly lower than those observed in quartile 2. Furthermore, within every category of body weight, those who were most active had significantly lower odds ratio of all-cause mortality. CONCLUSION: Our findings support the current recommendation that some physical activity is better than none, in protecting against all-cause mortality. The benefits of an active lifestyle are independent of body weight and that overweight and obese Puerto Rican men who are physically active experienced significant reductions in all-cause mortality compared with their sedentary counterparts. SN - 1047-2797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12495827/The_relationship_of_physical_activity_and_body_weight_with_all_cause_mortality:_results_from_the_Puerto_Rico_Heart_Health_Program_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1047279701002964 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -