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Plasma 7beta-hydroxycholesterol as a possible predictor of lung cancer risk.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2002; 11(12):1630-7CE

Abstract

Epidemiological data suggests a role of dietary cholesterol in the etiology of lung cancer without having a clear biological hypothesis. Although smoking as the outstanding risk factor for lung cancer may enhance lipid peroxidation reactions, this study was planned to assess smoking-independent associations between the extent of cholesterol oxidation and the risk for lung cancer. In the frame of a nested case-control study in European Prospective Investigation on Cancer-Heidelberg, six cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) were determined in plasma samples of 20 incident lung cancer patients obtained 1.9 +/- 0.6 years before diagnosis and in 40 matched (including smoking habits) controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by conditional logistic regression. Among all COP compounds tested, plasma 7beta-hydroxycholesterol was associated with lung cancer risk. The high crude risk estimate (OR approximately equals 5) became significant after adjustment for sports activity (OR = 6.83, CI = 1.08-43.01, 3rd versus 1st tertile). For the independent effect of 7beta-hydroxycholesterol, i.e., adjusted for other COP compounds, an OR of 8.08 (CI = 1.12-58.54, 3rd versus 1st tertile) was calculated (P = 0.04 for trend). Lung cancer risk adjusted for sports activity significantly increased by 26% (CI = 1.050-1.506, P = 0.01) per unit (1 nmol/mmol plasma cholesterol) of 7beta-hydroxycholesterol. No dietary factor had a significant effect in the regression model, but the dietary intake of meat, eggs, animal fat, cholesterol, and fruits (inversely) correlated with plasma COP concentrations. In this small study, plasma 7beta-hydroxycholesterol appeared to be a smoking-independent predictor of lung cancer risk and might therefore be used as a biomarker. Because of the rather high-risk estimate, research on possible intrinsic biological effects of this compound should be encouraged.

Authors+Show Affiliations

German Cancer Research Centre, Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Heidelberg, Germany. j.linseisen@wzw.tum.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12496054

Citation

Linseisen, Jakob, et al. "Plasma 7beta-hydroxycholesterol as a Possible Predictor of Lung Cancer Risk." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 11, no. 12, 2002, pp. 1630-7.
Linseisen J, Wolfram G, Miller AB. Plasma 7beta-hydroxycholesterol as a possible predictor of lung cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002;11(12):1630-7.
Linseisen, J., Wolfram, G., & Miller, A. B. (2002). Plasma 7beta-hydroxycholesterol as a possible predictor of lung cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 11(12), pp. 1630-7.
Linseisen J, Wolfram G, Miller AB. Plasma 7beta-hydroxycholesterol as a Possible Predictor of Lung Cancer Risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002;11(12):1630-7. PubMed PMID: 12496054.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma 7beta-hydroxycholesterol as a possible predictor of lung cancer risk. AU - Linseisen,Jakob, AU - Wolfram,Günther, AU - Miller,Anthony B, PY - 2002/12/24/pubmed PY - 2003/4/5/medline PY - 2002/12/24/entrez SP - 1630 EP - 7 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 11 IS - 12 N2 - Epidemiological data suggests a role of dietary cholesterol in the etiology of lung cancer without having a clear biological hypothesis. Although smoking as the outstanding risk factor for lung cancer may enhance lipid peroxidation reactions, this study was planned to assess smoking-independent associations between the extent of cholesterol oxidation and the risk for lung cancer. In the frame of a nested case-control study in European Prospective Investigation on Cancer-Heidelberg, six cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) were determined in plasma samples of 20 incident lung cancer patients obtained 1.9 +/- 0.6 years before diagnosis and in 40 matched (including smoking habits) controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by conditional logistic regression. Among all COP compounds tested, plasma 7beta-hydroxycholesterol was associated with lung cancer risk. The high crude risk estimate (OR approximately equals 5) became significant after adjustment for sports activity (OR = 6.83, CI = 1.08-43.01, 3rd versus 1st tertile). For the independent effect of 7beta-hydroxycholesterol, i.e., adjusted for other COP compounds, an OR of 8.08 (CI = 1.12-58.54, 3rd versus 1st tertile) was calculated (P = 0.04 for trend). Lung cancer risk adjusted for sports activity significantly increased by 26% (CI = 1.050-1.506, P = 0.01) per unit (1 nmol/mmol plasma cholesterol) of 7beta-hydroxycholesterol. No dietary factor had a significant effect in the regression model, but the dietary intake of meat, eggs, animal fat, cholesterol, and fruits (inversely) correlated with plasma COP concentrations. In this small study, plasma 7beta-hydroxycholesterol appeared to be a smoking-independent predictor of lung cancer risk and might therefore be used as a biomarker. Because of the rather high-risk estimate, research on possible intrinsic biological effects of this compound should be encouraged. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12496054/Plasma_7beta_hydroxycholesterol_as_a_possible_predictor_of_lung_cancer_risk_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=12496054 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -