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Diet and risk of dementia: Does fat matter?: The Rotterdam Study.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine whether high intake of total fat, saturated fatty acids (saturated fat), trans fatty acids (trans fat), and cholesterol and low intake of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), n-6 PUFA, and n-3 PUFA are associated with increased risk of dementia and its subtypes.

METHOD

Data from the Rotterdam Study, a prospective cohort study among elderly, were used. At baseline (1990 to 1993), 5,395 subjects had normal cognition, were noninstitutionalized, and underwent complete dietary assessment by a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. The cohort was continuously monitored for incident dementia, and re-examinations were performed in 1993 to 1994 and 1997 to 1999. The association between fat intake and incident dementia was examined by Cox's proportional hazards models.

RESULTS

After a mean follow-up of 6.0 years, 197 subjects developed dementia (146 AD, 29 vascular dementia). High intake of total, saturated, trans fat, and cholesterol and low intake of MUFA, PUFA, n-6 PUFA, and n-3 PUFA were not associated with increased risk of dementia or its subtypes. Rate ratios of dementia per standard deviation increase in intake were for total fat 0.93 (95% CI 0.81 to 1.07), for saturated fat 0.91 (95% CI 0.79 to 1.05), for trans fat 0.90 (95% CI 0.77 to 1.06), for cholesterol 0.93 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.08), for MUFA 0.96 (95% CI 0.84 to 1.10), for PUFA 1.05 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.38), for n-6 PUFA 1.03 (95% CI 0.77 to 1.36), and for n-3 PUFA 1.07 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.22).

CONCLUSION

High intake of total, saturated, and trans fat and cholesterol and low intake of MUFA, PUFA, n-6 PUFA, and n-3 PUFA were not associated with increased risk of dementia or its subtypes.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

    , , , , ,

    Source

    Neurology 59:12 2002 Dec 24 pg 1915-21

    MeSH

    Age Factors
    Aged
    Antioxidants
    Cholesterol, Dietary
    Cohort Studies
    Dementia
    Diet
    Dietary Fats
    Education
    Energy Metabolism
    Fatty Acids
    Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated
    Fatty Acids, Omega-3
    Fatty Acids, Omega-6
    Fatty Acids, Unsaturated
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Male
    Netherlands
    Neuropsychological Tests
    Risk Assessment
    Sex Factors
    Vitamin E

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12499483

    Citation

    Engelhart, M J., et al. "Diet and Risk of Dementia: Does Fat Matter?: the Rotterdam Study." Neurology, vol. 59, no. 12, 2002, pp. 1915-21.
    Engelhart MJ, Geerlings MI, Ruitenberg A, et al. Diet and risk of dementia: Does fat matter?: The Rotterdam Study. Neurology. 2002;59(12):1915-21.
    Engelhart, M. J., Geerlings, M. I., Ruitenberg, A., Van Swieten, J. C., Hofman, A., Witteman, J. C., & Breteler, M. M. (2002). Diet and risk of dementia: Does fat matter?: The Rotterdam Study. Neurology, 59(12), pp. 1915-21.
    Engelhart MJ, et al. Diet and Risk of Dementia: Does Fat Matter?: the Rotterdam Study. Neurology. 2002 Dec 24;59(12):1915-21. PubMed PMID: 12499483.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Diet and risk of dementia: Does fat matter?: The Rotterdam Study. AU - Engelhart,M J, AU - Geerlings,M I, AU - Ruitenberg,A, AU - Van Swieten,J C, AU - Hofman,A, AU - Witteman,J C M, AU - Breteler,M M B, PY - 2002/12/25/pubmed PY - 2003/1/15/medline PY - 2002/12/25/entrez SP - 1915 EP - 21 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 59 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine whether high intake of total fat, saturated fatty acids (saturated fat), trans fatty acids (trans fat), and cholesterol and low intake of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), n-6 PUFA, and n-3 PUFA are associated with increased risk of dementia and its subtypes. METHOD: Data from the Rotterdam Study, a prospective cohort study among elderly, were used. At baseline (1990 to 1993), 5,395 subjects had normal cognition, were noninstitutionalized, and underwent complete dietary assessment by a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. The cohort was continuously monitored for incident dementia, and re-examinations were performed in 1993 to 1994 and 1997 to 1999. The association between fat intake and incident dementia was examined by Cox's proportional hazards models. RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 6.0 years, 197 subjects developed dementia (146 AD, 29 vascular dementia). High intake of total, saturated, trans fat, and cholesterol and low intake of MUFA, PUFA, n-6 PUFA, and n-3 PUFA were not associated with increased risk of dementia or its subtypes. Rate ratios of dementia per standard deviation increase in intake were for total fat 0.93 (95% CI 0.81 to 1.07), for saturated fat 0.91 (95% CI 0.79 to 1.05), for trans fat 0.90 (95% CI 0.77 to 1.06), for cholesterol 0.93 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.08), for MUFA 0.96 (95% CI 0.84 to 1.10), for PUFA 1.05 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.38), for n-6 PUFA 1.03 (95% CI 0.77 to 1.36), and for n-3 PUFA 1.07 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.22). CONCLUSION: High intake of total, saturated, and trans fat and cholesterol and low intake of MUFA, PUFA, n-6 PUFA, and n-3 PUFA were not associated with increased risk of dementia or its subtypes. SN - 0028-3878 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12499483/Diet_and_risk_of_dementia:_Does_fat_matter:_The_Rotterdam_Study_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=12499483 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -