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Diet and prostate cancer.
Toxicology 2002; 181-182:89-94T

Abstract

The importance of dietary factors for prostate carcinogenesis has been proven by epidemiological studies of immigrants from Asia into the USA. Intake of foodstuffs rich in fat, including meat, is suggested to be a risk factor. Experimentally, while some studies demonstrated high fat intake to promote rat prostate carcinogenesis, others did not. Charcoal-cooked red meat and fish have been demonstrated to contain heterocyclic amines that are carcinogenic in rodents and non-primates. Among them, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) has been shown to induce cancers in the mammary glands, colon and prostate of rats. Although there are epidemiological data showing that PhIP could contribute to the development of breast cancer, equivalent evidence for prostate cancer is lacking. However, as protective dietary factors, micronutrients such as selenium, zinc, isoflavones, carotenoids and lycopenes and vitamins E and D have been listed. Animal experimentation on prostate cancer has consistently supported preventive potential for carotenoids and isoflavones, in contrast to the inconsistent results with high fat diets. Although the diet has apparently an important influence on prostate carcinogenesis in man, further research is necessary for clarification of specific factors in man.

Authors+Show Affiliations

First Department of Pathology, Nagoya City University Medical School 1-Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601, Japan. tshirai@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12505290

Citation

Shirai, Tomoyuki, et al. "Diet and Prostate Cancer." Toxicology, vol. 181-182, 2002, pp. 89-94.
Shirai T, Asamoto M, Takahashi S, et al. Diet and prostate cancer. Toxicology. 2002;181-182:89-94.
Shirai, T., Asamoto, M., Takahashi, S., & Imaida, K. (2002). Diet and prostate cancer. Toxicology, 181-182, pp. 89-94.
Shirai T, et al. Diet and Prostate Cancer. Toxicology. 2002 Dec 27;181-182:89-94. PubMed PMID: 12505290.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diet and prostate cancer. AU - Shirai,Tomoyuki, AU - Asamoto,Makoto, AU - Takahashi,Satoru, AU - Imaida,Katsumi, PY - 2002/12/31/pubmed PY - 2003/3/1/medline PY - 2002/12/31/entrez SP - 89 EP - 94 JF - Toxicology JO - Toxicology VL - 181-182 N2 - The importance of dietary factors for prostate carcinogenesis has been proven by epidemiological studies of immigrants from Asia into the USA. Intake of foodstuffs rich in fat, including meat, is suggested to be a risk factor. Experimentally, while some studies demonstrated high fat intake to promote rat prostate carcinogenesis, others did not. Charcoal-cooked red meat and fish have been demonstrated to contain heterocyclic amines that are carcinogenic in rodents and non-primates. Among them, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) has been shown to induce cancers in the mammary glands, colon and prostate of rats. Although there are epidemiological data showing that PhIP could contribute to the development of breast cancer, equivalent evidence for prostate cancer is lacking. However, as protective dietary factors, micronutrients such as selenium, zinc, isoflavones, carotenoids and lycopenes and vitamins E and D have been listed. Animal experimentation on prostate cancer has consistently supported preventive potential for carotenoids and isoflavones, in contrast to the inconsistent results with high fat diets. Although the diet has apparently an important influence on prostate carcinogenesis in man, further research is necessary for clarification of specific factors in man. SN - 0300-483X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12505290/Diet_and_prostate_cancer_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0300483X02002603 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -