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Non-obese hyperlipidemic Asian northern Indian males have adverse anthropometric profile.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2002 Aug; 12(4):178-83.NM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

Hyperlipidemia is commonly ascribed to obesity. We studied the association of anthropometric profile and nutrient intake with hyperlipidemia in non-obese Asian Indian males.

METHODS AND RESULTS

In a case-control study, non-diabetic, non-obese males with body mass index (BMI) < 25 Kg/m2 having primary hyperlipidemia (n = 50) were compared with healthy normolipidemic males (BMI < 25 Kg/m2, n = 50). In this study, BMI (p < 0.001), waist circumference (WC) (p < 0.001), waist/hip ratio (p < 0.01), skinfolds (p < 0.001), sum of four skinfolds (p < 0.001), and percentage of body fat (%BF) (p < 0.001) were significantly higher in hyperlipidemic subjects as compared to normolipidemic controls. High %BF (> 25%) was observed in 26% of hyperlipidemic subjects and in 8% normolipidemic controls (p < 0.01). Using analysis of covariance (after adjusting for BMI), WC (p < 0.001), %BF (p < 0.01) and %BF/BMI ratio (p < 0.01) were significantly higher in the hyperlipidemic subjects. Intakes of total calories, total fat, saturated fat, carbohydrates, n-3 and n-6 fatty acids, dietary fiber, vitamin E and n-6/n-3 fatty acids ratio were statistically comparable between the two groups. In hyperlipidemic subjects biceps skinfold correlated negatively to levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.28, p < 0.05) and serum triglycerides correlated positively to intakes of carbohydrate (r = 0.31, p < 0.05), and dietary n-3 fatty acids (r = 0.34, p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Hyperlipidemic Asian Indian males, defined as "non-obese" based on BMI, had adverse profile of anthropometric parameters and excess %BF as compared to normolipidemic males. Therefore, while dealing with hyperlipidemic Asian Indians, physicians should consider anthropometric parameters (WC), %BF, and %BF/BMI ratio in addition to BMI in the clinical assessment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. anoopmisra@hotmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12514937

Citation

Misra, A, et al. "Non-obese Hyperlipidemic Asian Northern Indian Males Have Adverse Anthropometric Profile." Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, vol. 12, no. 4, 2002, pp. 178-83.
Misra A, Athiko D, Sharma R, et al. Non-obese hyperlipidemic Asian northern Indian males have adverse anthropometric profile. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2002;12(4):178-83.
Misra, A., Athiko, D., Sharma, R., Pandey, R. M., & Khanna, N. (2002). Non-obese hyperlipidemic Asian northern Indian males have adverse anthropometric profile. Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases : NMCD, 12(4), 178-83.
Misra A, et al. Non-obese Hyperlipidemic Asian Northern Indian Males Have Adverse Anthropometric Profile. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2002;12(4):178-83. PubMed PMID: 12514937.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Non-obese hyperlipidemic Asian northern Indian males have adverse anthropometric profile. AU - Misra,A, AU - Athiko,D, AU - Sharma,R, AU - Pandey,R M, AU - Khanna,N, PY - 2003/1/8/pubmed PY - 2003/4/19/medline PY - 2003/1/8/entrez SP - 178 EP - 83 JF - Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD JO - Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis VL - 12 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Hyperlipidemia is commonly ascribed to obesity. We studied the association of anthropometric profile and nutrient intake with hyperlipidemia in non-obese Asian Indian males. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a case-control study, non-diabetic, non-obese males with body mass index (BMI) < 25 Kg/m2 having primary hyperlipidemia (n = 50) were compared with healthy normolipidemic males (BMI < 25 Kg/m2, n = 50). In this study, BMI (p < 0.001), waist circumference (WC) (p < 0.001), waist/hip ratio (p < 0.01), skinfolds (p < 0.001), sum of four skinfolds (p < 0.001), and percentage of body fat (%BF) (p < 0.001) were significantly higher in hyperlipidemic subjects as compared to normolipidemic controls. High %BF (> 25%) was observed in 26% of hyperlipidemic subjects and in 8% normolipidemic controls (p < 0.01). Using analysis of covariance (after adjusting for BMI), WC (p < 0.001), %BF (p < 0.01) and %BF/BMI ratio (p < 0.01) were significantly higher in the hyperlipidemic subjects. Intakes of total calories, total fat, saturated fat, carbohydrates, n-3 and n-6 fatty acids, dietary fiber, vitamin E and n-6/n-3 fatty acids ratio were statistically comparable between the two groups. In hyperlipidemic subjects biceps skinfold correlated negatively to levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.28, p < 0.05) and serum triglycerides correlated positively to intakes of carbohydrate (r = 0.31, p < 0.05), and dietary n-3 fatty acids (r = 0.34, p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Hyperlipidemic Asian Indian males, defined as "non-obese" based on BMI, had adverse profile of anthropometric parameters and excess %BF as compared to normolipidemic males. Therefore, while dealing with hyperlipidemic Asian Indians, physicians should consider anthropometric parameters (WC), %BF, and %BF/BMI ratio in addition to BMI in the clinical assessment. SN - 0939-4753 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12514937/Non_obese_hyperlipidemic_Asian_northern_Indian_males_have_adverse_anthropometric_profile_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -