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Roles of drinking pattern and type of alcohol consumed in coronary heart disease in men.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although moderate drinking confers a decreased risk of myocardial infarction, the roles of the drinking pattern and type of beverage remain unclear.

METHODS

We studied the association of alcohol consumption with the risk of myocardial infarction among 38,077 male health professionals who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer at base line. We assessed the consumption of beer, red wine, white wine, and liquor individually every four years using validated food-frequency questionnaires. We documented cases of nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal coronary heart disease from 1986 to 1998.

RESULTS

During 12 years of follow-up, there were 1418 cases of myocardial infarction. As compared with men who consumed alcohol less than once per week, men who consumed alcohol three to four or five to seven days per week had decreased risks of myocardial infarction (multivariate relative risk, 0.68 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.55 to 0.84] and 0.63 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.54 to 0.74], respectively). The risk was similar among men who consumed less than 10 g of alcohol per drinking day and those who consumed 30 g or more. No single type of beverage conferred additional benefit, nor did consumption with meals. A 12.5-g increase in daily alcohol consumption over a four-year follow-up period was associated with a relative risk of myocardial infarction of 0.78 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.62 to 0.99).

CONCLUSIONS

Among men, consumption of alcohol at least three to four days per week was inversely associated with the risk of myocardial infarction. Neither the type of beverage nor the proportion consumed with meals substantially altered this association. Men who increased their alcohol consumption by a moderate amount during follow-up had a decreased risk of myocardial infarction.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of General Medicine and Primary Care, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA. kmukamal@caregroup.harvard.edu

    , , , , ,

    Source

    The New England journal of medicine 348:2 2003 Jan 09 pg 109-18

    MeSH

    Alcohol Drinking
    Alcoholic Beverages
    Coronary Disease
    Diet Records
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Myocardial Infarction
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12519921

    Citation

    Mukamal, Kenneth J., et al. "Roles of Drinking Pattern and Type of Alcohol Consumed in Coronary Heart Disease in Men." The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 348, no. 2, 2003, pp. 109-18.
    Mukamal KJ, Conigrave KM, Mittleman MA, et al. Roles of drinking pattern and type of alcohol consumed in coronary heart disease in men. N Engl J Med. 2003;348(2):109-18.
    Mukamal, K. J., Conigrave, K. M., Mittleman, M. A., Camargo, C. A., Stampfer, M. J., Willett, W. C., & Rimm, E. B. (2003). Roles of drinking pattern and type of alcohol consumed in coronary heart disease in men. The New England Journal of Medicine, 348(2), pp. 109-18.
    Mukamal KJ, et al. Roles of Drinking Pattern and Type of Alcohol Consumed in Coronary Heart Disease in Men. N Engl J Med. 2003 Jan 9;348(2):109-18. PubMed PMID: 12519921.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Roles of drinking pattern and type of alcohol consumed in coronary heart disease in men. AU - Mukamal,Kenneth J, AU - Conigrave,Katherine M, AU - Mittleman,Murray A, AU - Camargo,Carlos A,Jr AU - Stampfer,Meir J, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Rimm,Eric B, PY - 2003/1/10/pubmed PY - 2003/1/16/medline PY - 2003/1/10/entrez SP - 109 EP - 18 JF - The New England journal of medicine JO - N. Engl. J. Med. VL - 348 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although moderate drinking confers a decreased risk of myocardial infarction, the roles of the drinking pattern and type of beverage remain unclear. METHODS: We studied the association of alcohol consumption with the risk of myocardial infarction among 38,077 male health professionals who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer at base line. We assessed the consumption of beer, red wine, white wine, and liquor individually every four years using validated food-frequency questionnaires. We documented cases of nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal coronary heart disease from 1986 to 1998. RESULTS: During 12 years of follow-up, there were 1418 cases of myocardial infarction. As compared with men who consumed alcohol less than once per week, men who consumed alcohol three to four or five to seven days per week had decreased risks of myocardial infarction (multivariate relative risk, 0.68 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.55 to 0.84] and 0.63 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.54 to 0.74], respectively). The risk was similar among men who consumed less than 10 g of alcohol per drinking day and those who consumed 30 g or more. No single type of beverage conferred additional benefit, nor did consumption with meals. A 12.5-g increase in daily alcohol consumption over a four-year follow-up period was associated with a relative risk of myocardial infarction of 0.78 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.62 to 0.99). CONCLUSIONS: Among men, consumption of alcohol at least three to four days per week was inversely associated with the risk of myocardial infarction. Neither the type of beverage nor the proportion consumed with meals substantially altered this association. Men who increased their alcohol consumption by a moderate amount during follow-up had a decreased risk of myocardial infarction. SN - 1533-4406 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12519921/Roles_of_drinking_pattern_and_type_of_alcohol_consumed_in_coronary_heart_disease_in_men_ L2 - https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa022095?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -