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Low vitamin B(6) plasma levels, a risk factor for thrombosis, in inflammatory bowel disease: role of inflammation and correlation with acute phase reactants.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk for thrombosis and vitamin deficiencies. Low plasma levels of vitamin B(6) are an independent risk factor for thrombosis and may cause hyperhomocysteinemia, another recognized risk factor for thrombosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate vitamin B(6) plasma levels in IBD patients.

METHODS

We studied 61 IBD patients: 32 with Crohn's disease and 29 with ulcerative colitis. For each patient, three sex- and age-matched healthy control subjects were studied.

RESULTS

Median vitamin B(6) levels were significantly lower in IBD patients (22.0 pmol/L, range 3.6-231.0) than in controls (31.1 pmol/L, 3.7-363.4; p < 0.01). In all, 13.1% IBD patients and 5.5% controls had plasma vitamin B(6) levels lower than the 5th percentile of distribution in normal controls (p < 0.05). Low vitamin B(6) levels were significantly more frequent in patients with active disease than in patients with quiescent disease (seven of 26, 26.9%, vs one of 35, 2.9%; p < 0.001). Moreover, patients with active disease had significantly lower median vitamin B(6) levels (13.4 pmol/L, range 3.6-124.0) than patients in a quiescent phase (27.0 pmol/L, 7.8-231.0; p < 0.001). Low vitamin B(6) levels were significantly correlated with serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (r = -0.36, 95% CI = -0.59 to -0.09, p < 0.01) and alpha(1)-acid-glycoprotein (r = -0.37, 95% CI = -0.59 to -0.10, p < 0.01). Hyperhomocysteinemia was more frequent in patients with low vitamin B(6) levels (three of eight, 37.5%) than in patients with normal levels (nine of 53, 17.0%; p = 0.18). There was no statistically significant correlation between vitamin B(6) and homocysteine plasma levels (r = -0.13, 95% CI = -0.37 to +0.14, p = 0.33).

CONCLUSIONS

Low vitamin B(6) plasma levels, an independent risk factor for thrombosis, are frequent in patients with IBD, especially those with active disease.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Service, Bianchi Bonomi Haemophilia and Thrombosis Center, IRCCS Maggiore Hospital and University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

    , , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Acute-Phase Proteins
    Adult
    Colitis, Ulcerative
    Crohn Disease
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Risk Factors
    Thrombosis
    Vitamin B 6

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12526945

    Citation

    Saibeni, Simone, et al. "Low Vitamin B(6) Plasma Levels, a Risk Factor for Thrombosis, in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Role of Inflammation and Correlation With Acute Phase Reactants." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 98, no. 1, 2003, pp. 112-7.
    Saibeni S, Cattaneo M, Vecchi M, et al. Low vitamin B(6) plasma levels, a risk factor for thrombosis, in inflammatory bowel disease: role of inflammation and correlation with acute phase reactants. Am J Gastroenterol. 2003;98(1):112-7.
    Saibeni, S., Cattaneo, M., Vecchi, M., Zighetti, M. L., Lecchi, A., Lombardi, R., ... de Franchis, R. (2003). Low vitamin B(6) plasma levels, a risk factor for thrombosis, in inflammatory bowel disease: role of inflammation and correlation with acute phase reactants. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 98(1), pp. 112-7.
    Saibeni S, et al. Low Vitamin B(6) Plasma Levels, a Risk Factor for Thrombosis, in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Role of Inflammation and Correlation With Acute Phase Reactants. Am J Gastroenterol. 2003;98(1):112-7. PubMed PMID: 12526945.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Low vitamin B(6) plasma levels, a risk factor for thrombosis, in inflammatory bowel disease: role of inflammation and correlation with acute phase reactants. AU - Saibeni,Simone, AU - Cattaneo,Marco, AU - Vecchi,Maurizio, AU - Zighetti,Maddalena Loredana, AU - Lecchi,Anna, AU - Lombardi,Rossana, AU - Meucci,Gianmichele, AU - Spina,Luisa, AU - de Franchis,Roberto, PY - 2003/1/16/pubmed PY - 2003/3/26/medline PY - 2003/1/16/entrez SP - 112 EP - 7 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 98 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk for thrombosis and vitamin deficiencies. Low plasma levels of vitamin B(6) are an independent risk factor for thrombosis and may cause hyperhomocysteinemia, another recognized risk factor for thrombosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate vitamin B(6) plasma levels in IBD patients. METHODS: We studied 61 IBD patients: 32 with Crohn's disease and 29 with ulcerative colitis. For each patient, three sex- and age-matched healthy control subjects were studied. RESULTS: Median vitamin B(6) levels were significantly lower in IBD patients (22.0 pmol/L, range 3.6-231.0) than in controls (31.1 pmol/L, 3.7-363.4; p < 0.01). In all, 13.1% IBD patients and 5.5% controls had plasma vitamin B(6) levels lower than the 5th percentile of distribution in normal controls (p < 0.05). Low vitamin B(6) levels were significantly more frequent in patients with active disease than in patients with quiescent disease (seven of 26, 26.9%, vs one of 35, 2.9%; p < 0.001). Moreover, patients with active disease had significantly lower median vitamin B(6) levels (13.4 pmol/L, range 3.6-124.0) than patients in a quiescent phase (27.0 pmol/L, 7.8-231.0; p < 0.001). Low vitamin B(6) levels were significantly correlated with serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (r = -0.36, 95% CI = -0.59 to -0.09, p < 0.01) and alpha(1)-acid-glycoprotein (r = -0.37, 95% CI = -0.59 to -0.10, p < 0.01). Hyperhomocysteinemia was more frequent in patients with low vitamin B(6) levels (three of eight, 37.5%) than in patients with normal levels (nine of 53, 17.0%; p = 0.18). There was no statistically significant correlation between vitamin B(6) and homocysteine plasma levels (r = -0.13, 95% CI = -0.37 to +0.14, p = 0.33). CONCLUSIONS: Low vitamin B(6) plasma levels, an independent risk factor for thrombosis, are frequent in patients with IBD, especially those with active disease. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12526945/full_citation L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=12526945 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -