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Multiple blood donations associated with iron deficiency in patients with restless legs syndrome.
Mayo Clin Proc 2003; 78(1):52-4MC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe a series of patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) and iron deficiency with and without anemia related to repeated blood donations.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

Study patients were identified by asking consecutive patients with RLS seen at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn, from February 1 to December 31, 2001, whether they donated blood. All patients who fulfilled the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group criteria for RLS, had donated blood a minimum of 3 times a year the preceding 3 years, and had iron deficiency (serum ferritin concentration <20 microg/L) were included in the study.

RESULTS

Eight patients met the study criteria. The mean +/- SD serum ferritin concentration was 8.1 +/- 3.5 microg/L, and 4 patients had anemia. In 6 of the 8 patients, RLS began at about the same time of or after blood donation. Patients had donated blood for 4.2 +/- 13 times a year (range, 3-6 times a year) for 15.2 +/- 83 years (range, 5-25 years). Hemoglobin concentrations were 12.8 +/- 1.8 g/dL (range, 10.6-15.5 g/dL). In 2 patients, RLS essentially resolved with correction of iron stores alone, and medications for RLS were successfully discontinued in 2 other patients.

CONCLUSIONS

Repeated blood donation is associated with induction or perpetuation of RLS due to iron deficiency with or without coexisting anemia. Potential blood donors should be questioned about RLS, and donation should not be allowed until the serum ferritin concentration has been measured and iron stores replenished if necessary.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sleep Disorders Center, Department of Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn 55905, USA. msilber@mayo.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12528877

Citation

Silber, Michael H., and Jarrett W. Richardson. "Multiple Blood Donations Associated With Iron Deficiency in Patients With Restless Legs Syndrome." Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 78, no. 1, 2003, pp. 52-4.
Silber MH, Richardson JW. Multiple blood donations associated with iron deficiency in patients with restless legs syndrome. Mayo Clin Proc. 2003;78(1):52-4.
Silber, M. H., & Richardson, J. W. (2003). Multiple blood donations associated with iron deficiency in patients with restless legs syndrome. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 78(1), pp. 52-4.
Silber MH, Richardson JW. Multiple Blood Donations Associated With Iron Deficiency in Patients With Restless Legs Syndrome. Mayo Clin Proc. 2003;78(1):52-4. PubMed PMID: 12528877.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Multiple blood donations associated with iron deficiency in patients with restless legs syndrome. AU - Silber,Michael H, AU - Richardson,Jarrett W, PY - 2003/1/17/pubmed PY - 2003/2/6/medline PY - 2003/1/17/entrez SP - 52 EP - 4 JF - Mayo Clinic proceedings JO - Mayo Clin. Proc. VL - 78 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe a series of patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) and iron deficiency with and without anemia related to repeated blood donations. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Study patients were identified by asking consecutive patients with RLS seen at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn, from February 1 to December 31, 2001, whether they donated blood. All patients who fulfilled the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group criteria for RLS, had donated blood a minimum of 3 times a year the preceding 3 years, and had iron deficiency (serum ferritin concentration <20 microg/L) were included in the study. RESULTS: Eight patients met the study criteria. The mean +/- SD serum ferritin concentration was 8.1 +/- 3.5 microg/L, and 4 patients had anemia. In 6 of the 8 patients, RLS began at about the same time of or after blood donation. Patients had donated blood for 4.2 +/- 13 times a year (range, 3-6 times a year) for 15.2 +/- 83 years (range, 5-25 years). Hemoglobin concentrations were 12.8 +/- 1.8 g/dL (range, 10.6-15.5 g/dL). In 2 patients, RLS essentially resolved with correction of iron stores alone, and medications for RLS were successfully discontinued in 2 other patients. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated blood donation is associated with induction or perpetuation of RLS due to iron deficiency with or without coexisting anemia. Potential blood donors should be questioned about RLS, and donation should not be allowed until the serum ferritin concentration has been measured and iron stores replenished if necessary. SN - 0025-6196 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12528877/Multiple_blood_donations_associated_with_iron_deficiency_in_patients_with_restless_legs_syndrome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0025-6196(11)61830-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -