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Bias in self-reported family history and relationship to glaucoma: the Blue Mountains Eye Study.
Ophthalmic Epidemiol 2002; 9(5):333-45OE

Abstract

PURPOSE

To examine bias in the relationship between self-reported family history of glaucoma and its relationship to the prevalence of glaucoma and ocular hypertension.

METHODS

In a cross-sectional population-based study of 3654 Australians aged 49-97, participants were asked whether any first-degree relatives had been diagnosed with glaucoma. Open-angle glaucoma was diagnosed from matching optic disc and typical visual field changes, after gonioscopy. Ocular hypertension (OH) was diagnosed from elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in subjects without glaucoma.

RESULTS

Glaucoma was present in 3.0% and ocular hypertension in 5.2% of subjects. A parent or sibling was reported to have glaucoma by 8.6%, including 10.5% of women and 5.9% of men. A positive family history was reported more frequently in parents (6.4%) than siblings (2.6%). Glaucoma was reported more frequently to affect mothers (5.0%) and sisters (1.6%) than fathers (1.5%) and brothers (1.2%). A first-degree family history was given by 15.7% of subjects with glaucoma compared to 8.3% of controls, odds ratio (OR) 3.2 (95% CI 1.8-5.6), after adjusting for glaucoma risk factors, including IOP. The association had a similar magnitude for a family history in parents and siblings. Although recall bias was evident from the finding of increased odds (OR 4.2) among previously diagnosed cases, the relationship with family history also persisted in newly-diagnosed cases (OR 2.4). A slightly stronger relationship was found between OH and glaucoma family history, OR 3.9 (95% CI 2.6-5.7), after adjusting for confounders, but was also strongly influenced by recall bias.

CONCLUSIONS

Although a positive family history of glaucoma may help to identify those at risk, it is subject to recall, selection and survival bias as well as community under-diagnosis of glaucoma and will most likely substantially underestimate the genetic influence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Sydney, Department of Ophthalmology and Westmead Millennium Institute (Centre for Vision Research), Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia. paulmi@westgate.wh.usyd.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12528918

Citation

Mitchell, Paul, et al. "Bias in Self-reported Family History and Relationship to Glaucoma: the Blue Mountains Eye Study." Ophthalmic Epidemiology, vol. 9, no. 5, 2002, pp. 333-45.
Mitchell P, Rochtchina E, Lee AJ, et al. Bias in self-reported family history and relationship to glaucoma: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2002;9(5):333-45.
Mitchell, P., Rochtchina, E., Lee, A. J., & Wang, J. J. (2002). Bias in self-reported family history and relationship to glaucoma: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Ophthalmic Epidemiology, 9(5), pp. 333-45.
Mitchell P, et al. Bias in Self-reported Family History and Relationship to Glaucoma: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2002;9(5):333-45. PubMed PMID: 12528918.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bias in self-reported family history and relationship to glaucoma: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. AU - Mitchell,Paul, AU - Rochtchina,Elena, AU - Lee,Anne J, AU - Wang,Jie Jin, PY - 2003/1/17/pubmed PY - 2003/2/13/medline PY - 2003/1/17/entrez SP - 333 EP - 45 JF - Ophthalmic epidemiology JO - Ophthalmic Epidemiol VL - 9 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: To examine bias in the relationship between self-reported family history of glaucoma and its relationship to the prevalence of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. METHODS: In a cross-sectional population-based study of 3654 Australians aged 49-97, participants were asked whether any first-degree relatives had been diagnosed with glaucoma. Open-angle glaucoma was diagnosed from matching optic disc and typical visual field changes, after gonioscopy. Ocular hypertension (OH) was diagnosed from elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in subjects without glaucoma. RESULTS: Glaucoma was present in 3.0% and ocular hypertension in 5.2% of subjects. A parent or sibling was reported to have glaucoma by 8.6%, including 10.5% of women and 5.9% of men. A positive family history was reported more frequently in parents (6.4%) than siblings (2.6%). Glaucoma was reported more frequently to affect mothers (5.0%) and sisters (1.6%) than fathers (1.5%) and brothers (1.2%). A first-degree family history was given by 15.7% of subjects with glaucoma compared to 8.3% of controls, odds ratio (OR) 3.2 (95% CI 1.8-5.6), after adjusting for glaucoma risk factors, including IOP. The association had a similar magnitude for a family history in parents and siblings. Although recall bias was evident from the finding of increased odds (OR 4.2) among previously diagnosed cases, the relationship with family history also persisted in newly-diagnosed cases (OR 2.4). A slightly stronger relationship was found between OH and glaucoma family history, OR 3.9 (95% CI 2.6-5.7), after adjusting for confounders, but was also strongly influenced by recall bias. CONCLUSIONS: Although a positive family history of glaucoma may help to identify those at risk, it is subject to recall, selection and survival bias as well as community under-diagnosis of glaucoma and will most likely substantially underestimate the genetic influence. SN - 0928-6586 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12528918/Bias_in_self_reported_family_history_and_relationship_to_glaucoma:_the_Blue_Mountains_Eye_Study_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1076/opep.9.5.333.10335 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -