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Attendance and alcohol use at parties and bars in college: a national survey of current drinkers.
J Stud Alcohol 2002; 63(6):726-33JS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study examines attendance and alcohol use at parties and bars among college students by gender, residence, year in school and legal drinking age.

METHOD

The study participants were respondents in the 1997 and 1999 Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study (CAS). The combined sample consisted of 12,830 students (61% women) who reported use of alcohol in the past 30 days prior to interview. Their responses provided information on attendance and alcohol use at parties (dormitory, fraternity, off campus) and off-campus bars. Logistic regression analyses examined the influence of gender, residence, year in school and legal drinking age related to attendance, drinking/non-drinking and heavy drinking (5 or more drinks) at each select setting.

RESULTS

Consistent with the literature, fraternity/ sorority parties were occasions of heavy drinking (49%) among drinkers in those settings, yet they drew upon smaller proportions of students (36%) when compared to off-campus parties (75%) and off-campus bars (68%). Off-campus parties (45%) and bars (37%) were also occasions for heavy drinking among drinkers in these settings. College residence was shown to relate to differential exposure to drinking settings, but residence had less impact on the decision to drink and the level of heavy drinking. Attendance at parties decreased with advance in school years, but attendance at off-campus bars increased. Although heavy drinking at off-campus bars decreased with advancing grade year in school, slightly higher proportions of under-age students (41%) compared to students of legal drinking age (35%) exhibited heavy drinking at off-campus bars.

CONCLUSIONS

The identification of high-risk settings and their correlates serves to better understand the development of heavy drinking on college campuses. Off-campus parties, as compared to campus parties and bars, may pose greater difficulties related to successful intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, School of Public Health, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12529073

Citation

Harford, Thomas C., et al. "Attendance and Alcohol Use at Parties and Bars in College: a National Survey of Current Drinkers." Journal of Studies On Alcohol, vol. 63, no. 6, 2002, pp. 726-33.
Harford TC, Wechsler H, Seibring M. Attendance and alcohol use at parties and bars in college: a national survey of current drinkers. J Stud Alcohol. 2002;63(6):726-33.
Harford, T. C., Wechsler, H., & Seibring, M. (2002). Attendance and alcohol use at parties and bars in college: a national survey of current drinkers. Journal of Studies On Alcohol, 63(6), pp. 726-33.
Harford TC, Wechsler H, Seibring M. Attendance and Alcohol Use at Parties and Bars in College: a National Survey of Current Drinkers. J Stud Alcohol. 2002;63(6):726-33. PubMed PMID: 12529073.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Attendance and alcohol use at parties and bars in college: a national survey of current drinkers. AU - Harford,Thomas C, AU - Wechsler,Henry, AU - Seibring,Mark, PY - 2003/1/17/pubmed PY - 2003/4/9/medline PY - 2003/1/17/entrez SP - 726 EP - 33 JF - Journal of studies on alcohol JO - J. Stud. Alcohol VL - 63 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study examines attendance and alcohol use at parties and bars among college students by gender, residence, year in school and legal drinking age. METHOD: The study participants were respondents in the 1997 and 1999 Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study (CAS). The combined sample consisted of 12,830 students (61% women) who reported use of alcohol in the past 30 days prior to interview. Their responses provided information on attendance and alcohol use at parties (dormitory, fraternity, off campus) and off-campus bars. Logistic regression analyses examined the influence of gender, residence, year in school and legal drinking age related to attendance, drinking/non-drinking and heavy drinking (5 or more drinks) at each select setting. RESULTS: Consistent with the literature, fraternity/ sorority parties were occasions of heavy drinking (49%) among drinkers in those settings, yet they drew upon smaller proportions of students (36%) when compared to off-campus parties (75%) and off-campus bars (68%). Off-campus parties (45%) and bars (37%) were also occasions for heavy drinking among drinkers in these settings. College residence was shown to relate to differential exposure to drinking settings, but residence had less impact on the decision to drink and the level of heavy drinking. Attendance at parties decreased with advance in school years, but attendance at off-campus bars increased. Although heavy drinking at off-campus bars decreased with advancing grade year in school, slightly higher proportions of under-age students (41%) compared to students of legal drinking age (35%) exhibited heavy drinking at off-campus bars. CONCLUSIONS: The identification of high-risk settings and their correlates serves to better understand the development of heavy drinking on college campuses. Off-campus parties, as compared to campus parties and bars, may pose greater difficulties related to successful intervention. SN - 0096-882X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12529073/Attendance_and_alcohol_use_at_parties_and_bars_in_college:_a_national_survey_of_current_drinkers_ L2 - https://www.jsad.com/doi/10.15288/jsa.2002.63.726 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -