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Injury rates and profiles in female ice hockey players.
Am J Sports Med 2003 Jan-Feb; 31(1):47-52AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Little data exist on injury rates and profiles in female ice hockey players.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the incidence of injury in female ice hockey players and compare injury rates with those of male players.

STUDY DESIGN

Prospective cohort study.

METHODS

Six male and six female teams from the Canada West Universities Athletic Association were followed prospectively for one varsity season. Preseason medical history forms were completed by each player. Injury report forms and attendance records for each team session were submitted by team therapists.

RESULTS

Male players reported 161 injuries, whereas female players reported 66 injuries. However, the overall injury rates for male (9.19 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures) and female (7.77 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures) players did not differ significantly. Ninety-six percent of injuries in female players and 79% in male players were related to contact mechanisms, even though intentional body checking is not allowed in female ice hockey. Women were more likely than men to be injured by contacting the boards or their opponent. Men sustained more severe injuries than women and missed about twice as many sessions (exposures) because of injury. Concussions were the most common injury in female players, followed by ankle sprains, adductor muscle strains, and sacroiliac dysfunction.

CONCLUSION

Although the injury rate in female ice hockey players was expected to be lower than that in male players because of the lack of intentional body checking, the injury rates were found to be similar.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sport Medicine Centre, Faculty of Kinesiology, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12531756

Citation

Schick, Deanna M., and Willem H. Meeuwisse. "Injury Rates and Profiles in Female Ice Hockey Players." The American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 31, no. 1, 2003, pp. 47-52.
Schick DM, Meeuwisse WH. Injury rates and profiles in female ice hockey players. Am J Sports Med. 2003;31(1):47-52.
Schick, D. M., & Meeuwisse, W. H. (2003). Injury rates and profiles in female ice hockey players. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 31(1), pp. 47-52.
Schick DM, Meeuwisse WH. Injury Rates and Profiles in Female Ice Hockey Players. Am J Sports Med. 2003;31(1):47-52. PubMed PMID: 12531756.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Injury rates and profiles in female ice hockey players. AU - Schick,Deanna M, AU - Meeuwisse,Willem H, PY - 2003/1/18/pubmed PY - 2003/4/23/medline PY - 2003/1/18/entrez SP - 47 EP - 52 JF - The American journal of sports medicine JO - Am J Sports Med VL - 31 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Little data exist on injury rates and profiles in female ice hockey players. OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence of injury in female ice hockey players and compare injury rates with those of male players. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. METHODS: Six male and six female teams from the Canada West Universities Athletic Association were followed prospectively for one varsity season. Preseason medical history forms were completed by each player. Injury report forms and attendance records for each team session were submitted by team therapists. RESULTS: Male players reported 161 injuries, whereas female players reported 66 injuries. However, the overall injury rates for male (9.19 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures) and female (7.77 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures) players did not differ significantly. Ninety-six percent of injuries in female players and 79% in male players were related to contact mechanisms, even though intentional body checking is not allowed in female ice hockey. Women were more likely than men to be injured by contacting the boards or their opponent. Men sustained more severe injuries than women and missed about twice as many sessions (exposures) because of injury. Concussions were the most common injury in female players, followed by ankle sprains, adductor muscle strains, and sacroiliac dysfunction. CONCLUSION: Although the injury rate in female ice hockey players was expected to be lower than that in male players because of the lack of intentional body checking, the injury rates were found to be similar. SN - 0363-5465 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12531756/Injury_rates_and_profiles_in_female_ice_hockey_players_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/03635465030310011901?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -