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High prevalence of cobalamin deficiency in Guatemalan schoolchildren: associations with low plasma holotranscobalamin II and elevated serum methylmalonic acid and plasma homocysteine concentrations.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Feb; 77(2):433-40.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Studies conducted in Guatemala, Mexico, and Venezuela have found high prevalences of low plasma cobalamin (vitamin B-12) concentrations in infants and children. It is not known whether these low cobalamin concentrations are accompanied by altered metabolic functions.

OBJECTIVE

We sought to assess the prevalence of cobalamin deficiency in Guatemalan children by using sensitive and specific markers of deficiency.

DESIGN

Children (n = 553) were screened for low plasma cobalamin. Those with low plasma cobalamin (< 162 pmol/L) were matched by age, grade, and sex to those with marginal (162-221 pmol/L) and adequate (> 221 pmol/L) concentrations. In this matched subset (n = 180), additional biochemical indicators of cobalamin deficiency were measured.

RESULTS

Of the 553 children screened, 11% had low plasma cobalamin and an additional 22% had marginal concentrations. The prevalences of elevated serum methylmalonic acid (MMA), plasma homocysteine, or both were significantly higher in children with low and marginal plasma cobalamin than in children with adequate plasma cobalamin. Mean serum MMA was high in all groups compared with values reported in other populations. Mean plasma holotranscobalamin II concentrations were significantly lower in children with low rather than marginal or adequate plasma cobalamin. However, holotranscobalamin II was a less sensitive indicator of cobalamin depletion than was MMA.

CONCLUSION

Biochemical markers of cobalamin deficiency confirmed that the cobalamin status of children with low and marginal plasma cobalamin is inadequate to support normal metabolic function.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Program in International Nutrition, University of California, Davis, 95616-8669, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12540405

Citation

Rogers, Lisa M., et al. "High Prevalence of Cobalamin Deficiency in Guatemalan Schoolchildren: Associations With Low Plasma Holotranscobalamin II and Elevated Serum Methylmalonic Acid and Plasma Homocysteine Concentrations." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 77, no. 2, 2003, pp. 433-40.
Rogers LM, Boy E, Miller JW, et al. High prevalence of cobalamin deficiency in Guatemalan schoolchildren: associations with low plasma holotranscobalamin II and elevated serum methylmalonic acid and plasma homocysteine concentrations. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;77(2):433-40.
Rogers, L. M., Boy, E., Miller, J. W., Green, R., Sabel, J. C., & Allen, L. H. (2003). High prevalence of cobalamin deficiency in Guatemalan schoolchildren: associations with low plasma holotranscobalamin II and elevated serum methylmalonic acid and plasma homocysteine concentrations. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 77(2), 433-40.
Rogers LM, et al. High Prevalence of Cobalamin Deficiency in Guatemalan Schoolchildren: Associations With Low Plasma Holotranscobalamin II and Elevated Serum Methylmalonic Acid and Plasma Homocysteine Concentrations. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;77(2):433-40. PubMed PMID: 12540405.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High prevalence of cobalamin deficiency in Guatemalan schoolchildren: associations with low plasma holotranscobalamin II and elevated serum methylmalonic acid and plasma homocysteine concentrations. AU - Rogers,Lisa M, AU - Boy,Erick, AU - Miller,Joshua W, AU - Green,Ralph, AU - Sabel,Jennifer Casterline, AU - Allen,Lindsay H, PY - 2003/1/24/pubmed PY - 2003/2/25/medline PY - 2003/1/24/entrez SP - 433 EP - 40 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 77 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Studies conducted in Guatemala, Mexico, and Venezuela have found high prevalences of low plasma cobalamin (vitamin B-12) concentrations in infants and children. It is not known whether these low cobalamin concentrations are accompanied by altered metabolic functions. OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess the prevalence of cobalamin deficiency in Guatemalan children by using sensitive and specific markers of deficiency. DESIGN: Children (n = 553) were screened for low plasma cobalamin. Those with low plasma cobalamin (< 162 pmol/L) were matched by age, grade, and sex to those with marginal (162-221 pmol/L) and adequate (> 221 pmol/L) concentrations. In this matched subset (n = 180), additional biochemical indicators of cobalamin deficiency were measured. RESULTS: Of the 553 children screened, 11% had low plasma cobalamin and an additional 22% had marginal concentrations. The prevalences of elevated serum methylmalonic acid (MMA), plasma homocysteine, or both were significantly higher in children with low and marginal plasma cobalamin than in children with adequate plasma cobalamin. Mean serum MMA was high in all groups compared with values reported in other populations. Mean plasma holotranscobalamin II concentrations were significantly lower in children with low rather than marginal or adequate plasma cobalamin. However, holotranscobalamin II was a less sensitive indicator of cobalamin depletion than was MMA. CONCLUSION: Biochemical markers of cobalamin deficiency confirmed that the cobalamin status of children with low and marginal plasma cobalamin is inadequate to support normal metabolic function. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12540405/High_prevalence_of_cobalamin_deficiency_in_Guatemalan_schoolchildren:_associations_with_low_plasma_holotranscobalamin_II_and_elevated_serum_methylmalonic_acid_and_plasma_homocysteine_concentrations_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/77.2.433 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -