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Scurvy: forgotten but not gone.
J Paediatr Child Health 2003 Jan-Feb; 39(1):75-7JP

Abstract

Scurvy is still seen sporadically in the developed world. At a time when subclinical vitamin C deficiency in the general population is being recognized increasingly, the need for clinicians to be aware of this disease remains. We present the case of a 9-year-old boy admitted to hospital with musculoskeletal pain, weakness and changes in the skin and gums. After extensive investigation, he was found to have vitamin C deficiency resulting from a restricted eating pattern. Musculoskeletal complaints are a common mode of presentation of scurvy in children. Failure to appreciate this fact and the risk factors for poor vitamin C intake in the paediatric age group can result in unnecessary and invasive investigations for apparent 'multisystem' disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Paediatrics, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. jonathan.akikusa@sympatico.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12542822

Citation

Akikusa, J D., et al. "Scurvy: Forgotten but Not Gone." Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, vol. 39, no. 1, 2003, pp. 75-7.
Akikusa JD, Garrick D, Nash MC. Scurvy: forgotten but not gone. J Paediatr Child Health. 2003;39(1):75-7.
Akikusa, J. D., Garrick, D., & Nash, M. C. (2003). Scurvy: forgotten but not gone. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 39(1), pp. 75-7.
Akikusa JD, Garrick D, Nash MC. Scurvy: Forgotten but Not Gone. J Paediatr Child Health. 2003;39(1):75-7. PubMed PMID: 12542822.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Scurvy: forgotten but not gone. AU - Akikusa,J D, AU - Garrick,D, AU - Nash,M C, PY - 2003/1/25/pubmed PY - 2003/5/24/medline PY - 2003/1/25/entrez SP - 75 EP - 7 JF - Journal of paediatrics and child health JO - J Paediatr Child Health VL - 39 IS - 1 N2 - Scurvy is still seen sporadically in the developed world. At a time when subclinical vitamin C deficiency in the general population is being recognized increasingly, the need for clinicians to be aware of this disease remains. We present the case of a 9-year-old boy admitted to hospital with musculoskeletal pain, weakness and changes in the skin and gums. After extensive investigation, he was found to have vitamin C deficiency resulting from a restricted eating pattern. Musculoskeletal complaints are a common mode of presentation of scurvy in children. Failure to appreciate this fact and the risk factors for poor vitamin C intake in the paediatric age group can result in unnecessary and invasive investigations for apparent 'multisystem' disease. SN - 1034-4810 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12542822/Scurvy:_forgotten_but_not_gone_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=1034-4810&date=2003&volume=39&issue=1&spage=75 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -