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Pediatric staghorn calculi: the role of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy monotherapy with special reference to ureteral stenting.
J Urol. 2003 Feb; 169(2):629-33.JU

Abstract

PURPOSE

Treatment for staghorn calculi in children represents a unique challenge. We assessed the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) (Dornier Medical Systems, Inc., Marietta, Georgia) monotherapy for the management of staghorn calculi in children with special reference to ureteral stenting.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

From June 1992 to January 2001 we treated 42 children 9 months to 12 years old with staghorn stones using the Piezolith 2501 (Richard Wolf GmBH, Knittlingen, Germany) lithotriptor. The initial group of 19 patients underwent ESWL without prophylactic ureteral stenting, while in the latter group of 23 a Double-J (Medical Engineering Corp., New York, New York) ureteral stent was inserted immediately before the first ESWL session. Mean patient age, stone size, number of shock waves and ESWL sessions, hospital stay, stone-free rate and major complications were compared in the 2 groups.

RESULTS

Overall 33 children (79%) were stone-free after 3 months. The 2 groups were comparable in regard to patient age, stone size, number of shock waves and ESWL sessions, and stone-free rates. Major complications developed in 21% of the unstented group, whereas none were observed in stented cases. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.035). Seven post-ESWL auxiliary procedures were required in the unstented group to manage complications. Hospital stay was significantly longer in the unstented compared with the stented group (p = 0.022). At a followup of 9 to 102 months (mean 47) stones recurred in 2 children, who were treated with further ESWL.

CONCLUSIONS

ESWL monotherapy was an efficient and safe modality for the treatment of staghorn calculi in children. Stented patients had fewer major complications and a shorter hospital stay. Prophylactic ureteral stenting is advisable before ESWL for staghorn calculi in children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, Armed Forces Hospital, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12544330

Citation

Al-Busaidy, S S., et al. "Pediatric Staghorn Calculi: the Role of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Monotherapy With Special Reference to Ureteral Stenting." The Journal of Urology, vol. 169, no. 2, 2003, pp. 629-33.
Al-Busaidy SS, Prem AR, Medhat M. Pediatric staghorn calculi: the role of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy monotherapy with special reference to ureteral stenting. J Urol. 2003;169(2):629-33.
Al-Busaidy, S. S., Prem, A. R., & Medhat, M. (2003). Pediatric staghorn calculi: the role of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy monotherapy with special reference to ureteral stenting. The Journal of Urology, 169(2), 629-33.
Al-Busaidy SS, Prem AR, Medhat M. Pediatric Staghorn Calculi: the Role of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Monotherapy With Special Reference to Ureteral Stenting. J Urol. 2003;169(2):629-33. PubMed PMID: 12544330.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pediatric staghorn calculi: the role of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy monotherapy with special reference to ureteral stenting. AU - Al-Busaidy,S S, AU - Prem,A R, AU - Medhat,M, PY - 2003/1/25/pubmed PY - 2003/2/26/medline PY - 2003/1/25/entrez SP - 629 EP - 33 JF - The Journal of urology JO - J Urol VL - 169 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: Treatment for staghorn calculi in children represents a unique challenge. We assessed the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) (Dornier Medical Systems, Inc., Marietta, Georgia) monotherapy for the management of staghorn calculi in children with special reference to ureteral stenting. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From June 1992 to January 2001 we treated 42 children 9 months to 12 years old with staghorn stones using the Piezolith 2501 (Richard Wolf GmBH, Knittlingen, Germany) lithotriptor. The initial group of 19 patients underwent ESWL without prophylactic ureteral stenting, while in the latter group of 23 a Double-J (Medical Engineering Corp., New York, New York) ureteral stent was inserted immediately before the first ESWL session. Mean patient age, stone size, number of shock waves and ESWL sessions, hospital stay, stone-free rate and major complications were compared in the 2 groups. RESULTS: Overall 33 children (79%) were stone-free after 3 months. The 2 groups were comparable in regard to patient age, stone size, number of shock waves and ESWL sessions, and stone-free rates. Major complications developed in 21% of the unstented group, whereas none were observed in stented cases. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.035). Seven post-ESWL auxiliary procedures were required in the unstented group to manage complications. Hospital stay was significantly longer in the unstented compared with the stented group (p = 0.022). At a followup of 9 to 102 months (mean 47) stones recurred in 2 children, who were treated with further ESWL. CONCLUSIONS: ESWL monotherapy was an efficient and safe modality for the treatment of staghorn calculi in children. Stented patients had fewer major complications and a shorter hospital stay. Prophylactic ureteral stenting is advisable before ESWL for staghorn calculi in children. SN - 0022-5347 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12544330/Pediatric_staghorn_calculi:_the_role_of_extracorporeal_shock_wave_lithotripsy_monotherapy_with_special_reference_to_ureteral_stenting_ L2 - https://www.jurology.com/doi/10.1097/01.ju.0000047231.36474.57?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -