Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Honey-medicated dressing: transformation of an ancient remedy into modern therapy.
Ann Plast Surg 2003; 50(2):143-7; discussion 147-8AP

Abstract

Honey has been applied for medicinal purposes since ancient times. Its antibacterial effects have been established during the past few decades. Still, modern medical practitioners hesitate to apply honey for local treatment of wounds. This may be explained by the expected messiness of such local application. Moreover, secondary infectious disease may be caused by contamination of honey with microorganisms. Hence, if honey is to be applied for medicinal purposes, it has to meet certain criteria. The authors evaluated the use and safety of a honey-medicated dressing that was developed to meet these criteria in a feasibility (phase II) study featuring 60 patients with chronic (n = 21), complicated surgical (n = 23), or acute traumatic (n = 16) wounds. In all but 1 patient, it was found easy to apply, helpful in cleaning the wounds, and without side effects. Based on these results, the authors advise to subject this dressing to a randomized, double blind, phase III study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, 1090 HM Amsterdam, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Clinical Trial
Clinical Trial, Phase II
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12567050

Citation

Ahmed, A Kalam J., et al. "Honey-medicated Dressing: Transformation of an Ancient Remedy Into Modern Therapy." Annals of Plastic Surgery, vol. 50, no. 2, 2003, pp. 143-7; discussion 147-8.
Ahmed AK, Hoekstra MJ, Hage JJ, et al. Honey-medicated dressing: transformation of an ancient remedy into modern therapy. Ann Plast Surg. 2003;50(2):143-7; discussion 147-8.
Ahmed, A. K., Hoekstra, M. J., Hage, J. J., & Karim, R. B. (2003). Honey-medicated dressing: transformation of an ancient remedy into modern therapy. Annals of Plastic Surgery, 50(2), pp. 143-7; discussion 147-8.
Ahmed AK, et al. Honey-medicated Dressing: Transformation of an Ancient Remedy Into Modern Therapy. Ann Plast Surg. 2003;50(2):143-7; discussion 147-8. PubMed PMID: 12567050.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Honey-medicated dressing: transformation of an ancient remedy into modern therapy. AU - Ahmed,A Kalam J, AU - Hoekstra,M Johannes, AU - Hage,J Joris, AU - Karim,Refaat B, PY - 2003/2/5/pubmed PY - 2003/5/24/medline PY - 2003/2/5/entrez SP - 143-7; discussion 147-8 JF - Annals of plastic surgery JO - Ann Plast Surg VL - 50 IS - 2 N2 - Honey has been applied for medicinal purposes since ancient times. Its antibacterial effects have been established during the past few decades. Still, modern medical practitioners hesitate to apply honey for local treatment of wounds. This may be explained by the expected messiness of such local application. Moreover, secondary infectious disease may be caused by contamination of honey with microorganisms. Hence, if honey is to be applied for medicinal purposes, it has to meet certain criteria. The authors evaluated the use and safety of a honey-medicated dressing that was developed to meet these criteria in a feasibility (phase II) study featuring 60 patients with chronic (n = 21), complicated surgical (n = 23), or acute traumatic (n = 16) wounds. In all but 1 patient, it was found easy to apply, helpful in cleaning the wounds, and without side effects. Based on these results, the authors advise to subject this dressing to a randomized, double blind, phase III study. SN - 0148-7043 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12567050/Honey_medicated_dressing:_transformation_of_an_ancient_remedy_into_modern_therapy_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.SAP.0000032306.44107.C1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -