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The effect of cardiorespiratory fitness and obesity on cancer mortality in women and men.
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003 Feb; 35(2):270-7.MS

Abstract

PURPOSE

The purpose of this study was to determine the independent and combined effects of cardiorespiratory fitness and obesity on all-cause cancer mortality for women and men.

METHODS

Using the Lipids Research Clinics Prevalence Study, we examined the relationship of fitness and obesity on cancer mortality among 2585 women and 2890 men followed from 1972-1976 to 1998. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured using a treadmill test and obesity was assessed using body mass index (BMI) calculated from measured height and weight. Gender-specific hazard ratios (HR) were calculated from proportional hazard models, which included covariates for age, education, smoking, alcohol intake, Keys score, and menopause (women only).

RESULTS

Adjusted cancer mortality was significantly lower in the most fit quintile relative to the other four quintiles for men (HR = 0.47; 95% CI, 0.27-0.81) but not for women (HR = 0.84; 95% CI, 0.52-1.36). Adjusted cancer mortality was significantly higher in the highest BMI quintile relative to the other four BMI quintiles for women (HR = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.06-2.09) but not for men (HR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.77-1.43). Further adjustment for BMI on fitness and adjustment for fitness on BMI did not meaningfully change the HR. There were no significant interactions between fitness and obesity in predicting cancer mortality for either women or men.

CONCLUSION

In this study, high fitness was a stronger predictor of cancer mortality in men, whereas high BMI was a stronger predictor of cancer mortality in women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA. kelly_evenson@unc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12569216

Citation

Evenson, Kelly R., et al. "The Effect of Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Obesity On Cancer Mortality in Women and Men." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 35, no. 2, 2003, pp. 270-7.
Evenson KR, Stevens J, Cai J, et al. The effect of cardiorespiratory fitness and obesity on cancer mortality in women and men. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003;35(2):270-7.
Evenson, K. R., Stevens, J., Cai, J., Thomas, R., & Thomas, O. (2003). The effect of cardiorespiratory fitness and obesity on cancer mortality in women and men. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(2), 270-7.
Evenson KR, et al. The Effect of Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Obesity On Cancer Mortality in Women and Men. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003;35(2):270-7. PubMed PMID: 12569216.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of cardiorespiratory fitness and obesity on cancer mortality in women and men. AU - Evenson,Kelly R, AU - Stevens,June, AU - Cai,Jianwen, AU - Thomas,Ratna, AU - Thomas,Olivia, PY - 2003/2/6/pubmed PY - 2003/5/7/medline PY - 2003/2/6/entrez SP - 270 EP - 7 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 35 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the independent and combined effects of cardiorespiratory fitness and obesity on all-cause cancer mortality for women and men. METHODS: Using the Lipids Research Clinics Prevalence Study, we examined the relationship of fitness and obesity on cancer mortality among 2585 women and 2890 men followed from 1972-1976 to 1998. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured using a treadmill test and obesity was assessed using body mass index (BMI) calculated from measured height and weight. Gender-specific hazard ratios (HR) were calculated from proportional hazard models, which included covariates for age, education, smoking, alcohol intake, Keys score, and menopause (women only). RESULTS: Adjusted cancer mortality was significantly lower in the most fit quintile relative to the other four quintiles for men (HR = 0.47; 95% CI, 0.27-0.81) but not for women (HR = 0.84; 95% CI, 0.52-1.36). Adjusted cancer mortality was significantly higher in the highest BMI quintile relative to the other four BMI quintiles for women (HR = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.06-2.09) but not for men (HR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.77-1.43). Further adjustment for BMI on fitness and adjustment for fitness on BMI did not meaningfully change the HR. There were no significant interactions between fitness and obesity in predicting cancer mortality for either women or men. CONCLUSION: In this study, high fitness was a stronger predictor of cancer mortality in men, whereas high BMI was a stronger predictor of cancer mortality in women. SN - 0195-9131 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12569216/The_effect_of_cardiorespiratory_fitness_and_obesity_on_cancer_mortality_in_women_and_men_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/01.MSS.0000053511.02356.72 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -