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Daughters and mothers exercising together: effects of home- and community-based programs.
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003 Feb; 35(2):286-96.MS

Abstract

PURPOSE

This pilot study compares the effectiveness of home- and community-based physical activity interventions that target mothers and daughters to increase physical activity and improve health-related fitness.

METHODS

Mothers (45.18 +/- 7.49 yr) and daughters (15.41 +/- 1.33 yr) were randomly assigned to a community-based (CB) (N = 20 participants) or home-based (HB) (N = 14 participants) program. CB participants attended three instructor-led sessions per week for 12 wk. HB participants were asked to participate in 3 sessions per week for 12 wk in a program similar to the CB program. The main difference between the programs was that CB activities were completed at a fitness facility within a university and HB activities were completed in or near the home. Before and after the intervention, changes in health-related fitness and physical activity were assessed. A series of 2 (group assignment) x 2 (time) ANOVAs were conducted to assess changes separately for mothers and daughters.

RESULTS

CB participants attended 77% of the sessions, and none of the pairs dropped out. HB participants completed 70% of the recommended sessions, and three pairs dropped out. Mothers and daughters in both groups significantly increased their participation in aerobic, muscular strength, and flexibility activities (P = 0.02 to 0.000). Daughters in both groups significantly improved their muscular endurance (sit-ups,P = 0.000). Mothers in both groups improved their muscular strength (push-ups, P = 0.003), muscular endurance (sit-ups, P = 0.000), flexibility (sit-and-reach, P = 0.008), and aerobic capacity (1-mile walk, P = 0.002). Positive changes in diastolic blood pressure also occurred (P = 0.008).

CONCLUSION

Mothers and daughters responded positively to CB and HB physical activity programs. Home-based physical activity programming is a cost-effective means to increase physical activity and improve health-related fitness in these groups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Exercise & Sport Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0920, USA. Lynda.Ransdell@health.utah.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12569218

Citation

Ransdell, Lynda B., et al. "Daughters and Mothers Exercising Together: Effects of Home- and Community-based Programs." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 35, no. 2, 2003, pp. 286-96.
Ransdell LB, Taylor A, Oakland D, et al. Daughters and mothers exercising together: effects of home- and community-based programs. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003;35(2):286-96.
Ransdell, L. B., Taylor, A., Oakland, D., Schmidt, J., Moyer-Mileur, L., & Shultz, B. (2003). Daughters and mothers exercising together: effects of home- and community-based programs. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(2), 286-96.
Ransdell LB, et al. Daughters and Mothers Exercising Together: Effects of Home- and Community-based Programs. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003;35(2):286-96. PubMed PMID: 12569218.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Daughters and mothers exercising together: effects of home- and community-based programs. AU - Ransdell,Lynda B, AU - Taylor,Alison, AU - Oakland,Darcie, AU - Schmidt,Jenny, AU - Moyer-Mileur,Laurie, AU - Shultz,Barry, PY - 2003/2/6/pubmed PY - 2003/5/7/medline PY - 2003/2/6/entrez SP - 286 EP - 96 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 35 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: This pilot study compares the effectiveness of home- and community-based physical activity interventions that target mothers and daughters to increase physical activity and improve health-related fitness. METHODS: Mothers (45.18 +/- 7.49 yr) and daughters (15.41 +/- 1.33 yr) were randomly assigned to a community-based (CB) (N = 20 participants) or home-based (HB) (N = 14 participants) program. CB participants attended three instructor-led sessions per week for 12 wk. HB participants were asked to participate in 3 sessions per week for 12 wk in a program similar to the CB program. The main difference between the programs was that CB activities were completed at a fitness facility within a university and HB activities were completed in or near the home. Before and after the intervention, changes in health-related fitness and physical activity were assessed. A series of 2 (group assignment) x 2 (time) ANOVAs were conducted to assess changes separately for mothers and daughters. RESULTS: CB participants attended 77% of the sessions, and none of the pairs dropped out. HB participants completed 70% of the recommended sessions, and three pairs dropped out. Mothers and daughters in both groups significantly increased their participation in aerobic, muscular strength, and flexibility activities (P = 0.02 to 0.000). Daughters in both groups significantly improved their muscular endurance (sit-ups,P = 0.000). Mothers in both groups improved their muscular strength (push-ups, P = 0.003), muscular endurance (sit-ups, P = 0.000), flexibility (sit-and-reach, P = 0.008), and aerobic capacity (1-mile walk, P = 0.002). Positive changes in diastolic blood pressure also occurred (P = 0.008). CONCLUSION: Mothers and daughters responded positively to CB and HB physical activity programs. Home-based physical activity programming is a cost-effective means to increase physical activity and improve health-related fitness in these groups. SN - 0195-9131 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12569218/Daughters_and_mothers_exercising_together:_effects_of_home__and_community_based_programs_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1249/01.MSS.0000048836.67270.1F DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -