Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Interaction of body mass index and attempt to lose weight in a national sample of US adults: association with reported food and nutrient intake, and biomarkers.
Eur J Clin Nutr 2003; 57(2):249-59EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study examined the interaction between body mass index (BMI) and attempting to lose weight for reporting of: (1) macro- and micronutrient intake; (2) intake of low-nutrient-density foods; and (3) serum biomarkers of dietary exposure and cardiovascular disease risk.

METHODS

Dietary, anthropometric and biochemical data were from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994), n=13 095. Multiple regression methods were used to examine the independent associations of BMI, trying to lose weight, or the interaction of BMI-trying to lose weight with reported intakes of energy, nutrients, percentage energy from low-nutrient-density foods (sweeteners, baked and dairy desserts, visible fats and salty snacks), and serum concentrations of vitamins, carotenoids and lipids.

RESULTS

BMI was an independent positive predictor (P<0.05) of percentage of energy from fat, saturated fat, but a negative predictor of the ratio of reported energy intake to estimated expenditure for basal needs (EI/BEE), percentage of energy from carbohydrate and alcohol (men only), and serum concentrations of folate, vitamin C, vitamin E and most carotenoids in both men and women. Trying to lose weight was a negative predictor (P<0.05) of EI/BEE, intake of energy, and energy density, but not micronutrient intake. Higher mean serum ascorbate, vitamin E, lutein/zeaxanthin, and other carotenoids (men only) concentrations were associated with trying to lose weight (P<0.05) in both men and women. Few adverse BMI-trying to lose weight interaction effects were noted.

CONCLUSIONS

There was little evidence of increased nutritional risk in those reportedly trying to lose weight irrespective of weight status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family, Nutrition and Exercise Sciences, Queens College of the City University of New York, Flushing, New York, USA. ashima_kant@qc.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12571656

Citation

Kant, A K.. "Interaction of Body Mass Index and Attempt to Lose Weight in a National Sample of US Adults: Association With Reported Food and Nutrient Intake, and Biomarkers." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 57, no. 2, 2003, pp. 249-59.
Kant AK. Interaction of body mass index and attempt to lose weight in a national sample of US adults: association with reported food and nutrient intake, and biomarkers. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003;57(2):249-59.
Kant, A. K. (2003). Interaction of body mass index and attempt to lose weight in a national sample of US adults: association with reported food and nutrient intake, and biomarkers. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 57(2), pp. 249-59.
Kant AK. Interaction of Body Mass Index and Attempt to Lose Weight in a National Sample of US Adults: Association With Reported Food and Nutrient Intake, and Biomarkers. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003;57(2):249-59. PubMed PMID: 12571656.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Interaction of body mass index and attempt to lose weight in a national sample of US adults: association with reported food and nutrient intake, and biomarkers. A1 - Kant,A K, PY - 2001/10/11/received PY - 2002/05/29/revised PY - 2002/06/04/accepted PY - 2003/2/7/pubmed PY - 2003/7/17/medline PY - 2003/2/7/entrez SP - 249 EP - 59 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 57 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study examined the interaction between body mass index (BMI) and attempting to lose weight for reporting of: (1) macro- and micronutrient intake; (2) intake of low-nutrient-density foods; and (3) serum biomarkers of dietary exposure and cardiovascular disease risk. METHODS: Dietary, anthropometric and biochemical data were from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994), n=13 095. Multiple regression methods were used to examine the independent associations of BMI, trying to lose weight, or the interaction of BMI-trying to lose weight with reported intakes of energy, nutrients, percentage energy from low-nutrient-density foods (sweeteners, baked and dairy desserts, visible fats and salty snacks), and serum concentrations of vitamins, carotenoids and lipids. RESULTS: BMI was an independent positive predictor (P<0.05) of percentage of energy from fat, saturated fat, but a negative predictor of the ratio of reported energy intake to estimated expenditure for basal needs (EI/BEE), percentage of energy from carbohydrate and alcohol (men only), and serum concentrations of folate, vitamin C, vitamin E and most carotenoids in both men and women. Trying to lose weight was a negative predictor (P<0.05) of EI/BEE, intake of energy, and energy density, but not micronutrient intake. Higher mean serum ascorbate, vitamin E, lutein/zeaxanthin, and other carotenoids (men only) concentrations were associated with trying to lose weight (P<0.05) in both men and women. Few adverse BMI-trying to lose weight interaction effects were noted. CONCLUSIONS: There was little evidence of increased nutritional risk in those reportedly trying to lose weight irrespective of weight status. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12571656/Interaction_of_body_mass_index_and_attempt_to_lose_weight_in_a_national_sample_of_US_adults:_association_with_reported_food_and_nutrient_intake_and_biomarkers_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601549 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -