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Antioxidant micronutrients and risk of rheumatoid arthritis in a cohort of older women.
Am J Epidemiol 2003; 157(4):345-54AJ

Abstract

The association of antioxidant vitamins and trace elements from foods and supplements with risk of rheumatoid arthritis was evaluated in a prospective cohort study of 29,368 women who were aged 55-69 years at baseline in 1986. Through 1997, 152 cases of rheumatoid arthritis were identified. After controlling for other risk factors, greater intakes (highest tertile vs. lowest) of supplemental vitamin C (relative risk (RR) = 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.48, 1.09; p-trend = 0.08) and supplemental vitamin E (RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.47, 1.12; p-trend = 0.06) were inversely associated with rheumatoid arthritis. There was no association with total carotenoids, alpha- or beta-carotene, lycopene, or lutein/zeaxanthin, while there was an inverse association with beta-cryptoxanthin (RR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.39, 0.90; p-trend = 0.01). Greater use of supplemental zinc (RR = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.17, 0.88; p-trend = 0.03) was inversely associated with rheumatoid arthritis, while any use of supplemental copper (RR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.28, 1.03) and manganese (RR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.23, 1.07) showed suggestive inverse associations with rheumatoid arthritis. Greater intakes of fruit (RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.46, 1.12; p-trend = 0.13) and cruciferous vegetables (RR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.42, 1.01; p-trend = 0.07) also exhibited trends toward inverse associations with risk. When the antioxidants were modeled together, only beta-cryptoxanthin and supplemental zinc were statistically significant predictors. Intake of certain antioxidant micronutrients, particularly beta-cryptoxanthin and supplemental zinc, and possibly diets high in fruits and cruciferous vegetables, may be protective against the development of rheumatoid arthritis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. cerhan.james@mayo.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12578805

Citation

Cerhan, James R., et al. "Antioxidant Micronutrients and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis in a Cohort of Older Women." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 157, no. 4, 2003, pp. 345-54.
Cerhan JR, Saag KG, Merlino LA, et al. Antioxidant micronutrients and risk of rheumatoid arthritis in a cohort of older women. Am J Epidemiol. 2003;157(4):345-54.
Cerhan, J. R., Saag, K. G., Merlino, L. A., Mikuls, T. R., & Criswell, L. A. (2003). Antioxidant micronutrients and risk of rheumatoid arthritis in a cohort of older women. American Journal of Epidemiology, 157(4), pp. 345-54.
Cerhan JR, et al. Antioxidant Micronutrients and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis in a Cohort of Older Women. Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Feb 15;157(4):345-54. PubMed PMID: 12578805.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antioxidant micronutrients and risk of rheumatoid arthritis in a cohort of older women. AU - Cerhan,James R, AU - Saag,Kenneth G, AU - Merlino,Linda A, AU - Mikuls,Ted R, AU - Criswell,Lindsey A, PY - 2003/2/13/pubmed PY - 2003/3/14/medline PY - 2003/2/13/entrez SP - 345 EP - 54 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 157 IS - 4 N2 - The association of antioxidant vitamins and trace elements from foods and supplements with risk of rheumatoid arthritis was evaluated in a prospective cohort study of 29,368 women who were aged 55-69 years at baseline in 1986. Through 1997, 152 cases of rheumatoid arthritis were identified. After controlling for other risk factors, greater intakes (highest tertile vs. lowest) of supplemental vitamin C (relative risk (RR) = 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.48, 1.09; p-trend = 0.08) and supplemental vitamin E (RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.47, 1.12; p-trend = 0.06) were inversely associated with rheumatoid arthritis. There was no association with total carotenoids, alpha- or beta-carotene, lycopene, or lutein/zeaxanthin, while there was an inverse association with beta-cryptoxanthin (RR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.39, 0.90; p-trend = 0.01). Greater use of supplemental zinc (RR = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.17, 0.88; p-trend = 0.03) was inversely associated with rheumatoid arthritis, while any use of supplemental copper (RR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.28, 1.03) and manganese (RR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.23, 1.07) showed suggestive inverse associations with rheumatoid arthritis. Greater intakes of fruit (RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.46, 1.12; p-trend = 0.13) and cruciferous vegetables (RR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.42, 1.01; p-trend = 0.07) also exhibited trends toward inverse associations with risk. When the antioxidants were modeled together, only beta-cryptoxanthin and supplemental zinc were statistically significant predictors. Intake of certain antioxidant micronutrients, particularly beta-cryptoxanthin and supplemental zinc, and possibly diets high in fruits and cruciferous vegetables, may be protective against the development of rheumatoid arthritis. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12578805/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwf205 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -