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Antioxidant micronutrients and risk of rheumatoid arthritis in a cohort of older women.

Abstract

The association of antioxidant vitamins and trace elements from foods and supplements with risk of rheumatoid arthritis was evaluated in a prospective cohort study of 29,368 women who were aged 55-69 years at baseline in 1986. Through 1997, 152 cases of rheumatoid arthritis were identified. After controlling for other risk factors, greater intakes (highest tertile vs. lowest) of supplemental vitamin C (relative risk (RR) = 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.48, 1.09; p-trend = 0.08) and supplemental vitamin E (RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.47, 1.12; p-trend = 0.06) were inversely associated with rheumatoid arthritis. There was no association with total carotenoids, alpha- or beta-carotene, lycopene, or lutein/zeaxanthin, while there was an inverse association with beta-cryptoxanthin (RR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.39, 0.90; p-trend = 0.01). Greater use of supplemental zinc (RR = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.17, 0.88; p-trend = 0.03) was inversely associated with rheumatoid arthritis, while any use of supplemental copper (RR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.28, 1.03) and manganese (RR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.23, 1.07) showed suggestive inverse associations with rheumatoid arthritis. Greater intakes of fruit (RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.46, 1.12; p-trend = 0.13) and cruciferous vegetables (RR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.42, 1.01; p-trend = 0.07) also exhibited trends toward inverse associations with risk. When the antioxidants were modeled together, only beta-cryptoxanthin and supplemental zinc were statistically significant predictors. Intake of certain antioxidant micronutrients, particularly beta-cryptoxanthin and supplemental zinc, and possibly diets high in fruits and cruciferous vegetables, may be protective against the development of rheumatoid arthritis.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. cerhan.james@mayo.edu

    , , ,

    Source

    American journal of epidemiology 157:4 2003 Feb 15 pg 345-54

    MeSH

    Aged
    Antioxidants
    Arthritis, Rheumatoid
    Cryptoxanthins
    Diet
    Female
    Humans
    Iowa
    Micronutrients
    Middle Aged
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Xanthophylls
    Zinc
    beta Carotene

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12578805

    Citation

    Cerhan, James R., et al. "Antioxidant Micronutrients and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis in a Cohort of Older Women." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 157, no. 4, 2003, pp. 345-54.
    Cerhan JR, Saag KG, Merlino LA, et al. Antioxidant micronutrients and risk of rheumatoid arthritis in a cohort of older women. Am J Epidemiol. 2003;157(4):345-54.
    Cerhan, J. R., Saag, K. G., Merlino, L. A., Mikuls, T. R., & Criswell, L. A. (2003). Antioxidant micronutrients and risk of rheumatoid arthritis in a cohort of older women. American Journal of Epidemiology, 157(4), pp. 345-54.
    Cerhan JR, et al. Antioxidant Micronutrients and Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis in a Cohort of Older Women. Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Feb 15;157(4):345-54. PubMed PMID: 12578805.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Antioxidant micronutrients and risk of rheumatoid arthritis in a cohort of older women. AU - Cerhan,James R, AU - Saag,Kenneth G, AU - Merlino,Linda A, AU - Mikuls,Ted R, AU - Criswell,Lindsey A, PY - 2003/2/13/pubmed PY - 2003/3/14/medline PY - 2003/2/13/entrez SP - 345 EP - 54 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 157 IS - 4 N2 - The association of antioxidant vitamins and trace elements from foods and supplements with risk of rheumatoid arthritis was evaluated in a prospective cohort study of 29,368 women who were aged 55-69 years at baseline in 1986. Through 1997, 152 cases of rheumatoid arthritis were identified. After controlling for other risk factors, greater intakes (highest tertile vs. lowest) of supplemental vitamin C (relative risk (RR) = 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.48, 1.09; p-trend = 0.08) and supplemental vitamin E (RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.47, 1.12; p-trend = 0.06) were inversely associated with rheumatoid arthritis. There was no association with total carotenoids, alpha- or beta-carotene, lycopene, or lutein/zeaxanthin, while there was an inverse association with beta-cryptoxanthin (RR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.39, 0.90; p-trend = 0.01). Greater use of supplemental zinc (RR = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.17, 0.88; p-trend = 0.03) was inversely associated with rheumatoid arthritis, while any use of supplemental copper (RR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.28, 1.03) and manganese (RR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.23, 1.07) showed suggestive inverse associations with rheumatoid arthritis. Greater intakes of fruit (RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.46, 1.12; p-trend = 0.13) and cruciferous vegetables (RR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.42, 1.01; p-trend = 0.07) also exhibited trends toward inverse associations with risk. When the antioxidants were modeled together, only beta-cryptoxanthin and supplemental zinc were statistically significant predictors. Intake of certain antioxidant micronutrients, particularly beta-cryptoxanthin and supplemental zinc, and possibly diets high in fruits and cruciferous vegetables, may be protective against the development of rheumatoid arthritis. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12578805/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwf205 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -