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Incidence of Alzheimer disease in a biracial urban community: relation to apolipoprotein E allele status.
Arch Neurol 2003; 60(2):185-9AN

Abstract

CONTEXT

Few studies compare Alzheimer disease (AD) incidence among black and white subjects.

OBJECTIVE

To estimate incidence and the effect of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon4 allele in these races.

DESIGN

Population-based study of disease incidence using a random, stratified sample.

SETTING

A geographically defined community of 3 adjacent neighborhoods in Chicago, Ill.

PARTICIPANTS

A total of 6158 persons (78.7% overall; 80.5% of the black subjects and 74.6% of the white subjects) participated; 4.1 years later, persons initially free of AD were sampled for clinical evaluation for disease incidence (overall 842 persons [74.8%] participated; 67.6% of the black subjects and 81.9% of the white subjects).

INTERVENTIONS

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Incident, clinically diagnosed AD.

RESULTS

The effect of the APOE epsilon4 allele on the risk of AD differed strongly for black and white subjects. Among white subjects, the presence of the APOE epsilon4 allele was associated with a 2.73-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40-5.32) increase in risk while among black subjects there was no increase in risk (odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-2.68). Black race was associated with a nonsignificantly increased risk of AD with an odds ratio of 1.84 (95% CI, 0.73-4.66) if APOE and its interaction with race are considered, and an odds ratio of 1.28 (95% CI, 0.54-2.98) if they are not. The incidence of AD was 1.45% (95% CI, 0.89%-2.01%) per year among persons 65 to 74 years old, 4.73% (95% CI, 3.83%-5.64%) among those 75 to 84 years old, and 9.11% (95% CI, 7.36%-10.9%) among those 85 years and older.

CONCLUSION

Apolipoprotein E epsilon4 led to increased risk of AD among white subjects but not black subjects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rush Institute on Healthy Aging, Chicago, IL, USA. devans2@rush.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comment
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12580702

Citation

Evans, Denis A., et al. "Incidence of Alzheimer Disease in a Biracial Urban Community: Relation to Apolipoprotein E Allele Status." Archives of Neurology, vol. 60, no. 2, 2003, pp. 185-9.
Evans DA, Bennett DA, Wilson RS, et al. Incidence of Alzheimer disease in a biracial urban community: relation to apolipoprotein E allele status. Arch Neurol. 2003;60(2):185-9.
Evans, D. A., Bennett, D. A., Wilson, R. S., Bienias, J. L., Morris, M. C., Scherr, P. A., ... Schneider, J. (2003). Incidence of Alzheimer disease in a biracial urban community: relation to apolipoprotein E allele status. Archives of Neurology, 60(2), pp. 185-9.
Evans DA, et al. Incidence of Alzheimer Disease in a Biracial Urban Community: Relation to Apolipoprotein E Allele Status. Arch Neurol. 2003;60(2):185-9. PubMed PMID: 12580702.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Incidence of Alzheimer disease in a biracial urban community: relation to apolipoprotein E allele status. AU - Evans,Denis A, AU - Bennett,David A, AU - Wilson,Robert S, AU - Bienias,Julia L, AU - Morris,Martha Clare, AU - Scherr,Paul A, AU - Hebert,Liesi E, AU - Aggarwal,Neelum, AU - Beckett,Laurel A, AU - Joglekar,Rajiv, AU - Berry-Kravis,Elizabeth, AU - Schneider,Julie, PY - 2003/2/13/pubmed PY - 2003/3/12/medline PY - 2003/2/13/entrez SP - 185 EP - 9 JF - Archives of neurology JO - Arch. Neurol. VL - 60 IS - 2 N2 - CONTEXT: Few studies compare Alzheimer disease (AD) incidence among black and white subjects. OBJECTIVE: To estimate incidence and the effect of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon4 allele in these races. DESIGN: Population-based study of disease incidence using a random, stratified sample. SETTING: A geographically defined community of 3 adjacent neighborhoods in Chicago, Ill. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 6158 persons (78.7% overall; 80.5% of the black subjects and 74.6% of the white subjects) participated; 4.1 years later, persons initially free of AD were sampled for clinical evaluation for disease incidence (overall 842 persons [74.8%] participated; 67.6% of the black subjects and 81.9% of the white subjects). INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Incident, clinically diagnosed AD. RESULTS: The effect of the APOE epsilon4 allele on the risk of AD differed strongly for black and white subjects. Among white subjects, the presence of the APOE epsilon4 allele was associated with a 2.73-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40-5.32) increase in risk while among black subjects there was no increase in risk (odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-2.68). Black race was associated with a nonsignificantly increased risk of AD with an odds ratio of 1.84 (95% CI, 0.73-4.66) if APOE and its interaction with race are considered, and an odds ratio of 1.28 (95% CI, 0.54-2.98) if they are not. The incidence of AD was 1.45% (95% CI, 0.89%-2.01%) per year among persons 65 to 74 years old, 4.73% (95% CI, 3.83%-5.64%) among those 75 to 84 years old, and 9.11% (95% CI, 7.36%-10.9%) among those 85 years and older. CONCLUSION: Apolipoprotein E epsilon4 led to increased risk of AD among white subjects but not black subjects. SN - 0003-9942 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12580702/Incidence_of_Alzheimer_disease_in_a_biracial_urban_community:_relation_to_apolipoprotein_E_allele_status_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/vol/60/pg/185 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -