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Antioxidant vitamin intake and risk of Alzheimer disease.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The generation of oxygen free radicals is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD).

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether the intake of antioxidant vitamins decreases the risk of AD.

METHODS

We investigated the relationship between AD and the intake of carotenes, vitamin C, and vitamin E in 980 elderly subjects in the Washington Heights-Inwood Columbia Aging Project who were free of dementia at baseline and were followed for a mean time of 4 years. Semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires were administered between baseline and the first follow-up visit. Cox proportional hazards regression models were conducted with quartiles of each vitamin intake as the exposure of interest and incident AD as the outcome, adjusted for age, level of education, sex, APOE epsilon4 status, ethnicity, and smoking.

RESULTS

There were 242 incident cases of AD in 4,023 person-years of follow-up (6 per 100 person-years). Intake of carotenes and vitamin C, or vitamin E in supplemental or dietary (nonsupplemental) form or in both forms, was not related to a decreased risk of AD. Trend tests for the association between quartiles of total intake of vitamins C and E also were not significant.

CONCLUSION

Neither dietary, supplemental, nor total intake of carotenes and vitamins C and E was associated with a decreased risk of AD in this study.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, New York, NY, USA.

    , ,

    Source

    Archives of neurology 60:2 2003 Feb pg 203-8

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Alzheimer Disease
    Antioxidants
    Ascorbic Acid
    Carotenoids
    Cohort Studies
    Diet
    Dietary Supplements
    Female
    Humans
    Incidence
    Male
    Risk Factors
    Vitamin E

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12580704

    Citation

    Luchsinger, Jose A., et al. "Antioxidant Vitamin Intake and Risk of Alzheimer Disease." Archives of Neurology, vol. 60, no. 2, 2003, pp. 203-8.
    Luchsinger JA, Tang MX, Shea S, et al. Antioxidant vitamin intake and risk of Alzheimer disease. Arch Neurol. 2003;60(2):203-8.
    Luchsinger, J. A., Tang, M. X., Shea, S., & Mayeux, R. (2003). Antioxidant vitamin intake and risk of Alzheimer disease. Archives of Neurology, 60(2), pp. 203-8.
    Luchsinger JA, et al. Antioxidant Vitamin Intake and Risk of Alzheimer Disease. Arch Neurol. 2003;60(2):203-8. PubMed PMID: 12580704.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Antioxidant vitamin intake and risk of Alzheimer disease. AU - Luchsinger,Jose A, AU - Tang,Ming-Xin, AU - Shea,Steven, AU - Mayeux,Richard, PY - 2003/2/13/pubmed PY - 2003/3/12/medline PY - 2003/2/13/entrez SP - 203 EP - 8 JF - Archives of neurology JO - Arch. Neurol. VL - 60 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: The generation of oxygen free radicals is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the intake of antioxidant vitamins decreases the risk of AD. METHODS: We investigated the relationship between AD and the intake of carotenes, vitamin C, and vitamin E in 980 elderly subjects in the Washington Heights-Inwood Columbia Aging Project who were free of dementia at baseline and were followed for a mean time of 4 years. Semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires were administered between baseline and the first follow-up visit. Cox proportional hazards regression models were conducted with quartiles of each vitamin intake as the exposure of interest and incident AD as the outcome, adjusted for age, level of education, sex, APOE epsilon4 status, ethnicity, and smoking. RESULTS: There were 242 incident cases of AD in 4,023 person-years of follow-up (6 per 100 person-years). Intake of carotenes and vitamin C, or vitamin E in supplemental or dietary (nonsupplemental) form or in both forms, was not related to a decreased risk of AD. Trend tests for the association between quartiles of total intake of vitamins C and E also were not significant. CONCLUSION: Neither dietary, supplemental, nor total intake of carotenes and vitamins C and E was associated with a decreased risk of AD in this study. SN - 0003-9942 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12580704/Antioxidant_vitamin_intake_and_risk_of_Alzheimer_disease_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/vol/60/pg/203 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -