Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Folate intakes and awareness of folate to prevent neural tube defects: a survey of women living in Vancouver, Canada.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Feb; 103(2):181-5.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To estimate folate intake and knowledge in women of childbearing age, in relation to risk of neural tube defects.

SUBJECTS/SETTING

One hundred forty-eight women (aged 18 to 45 years) in the Vancouver area of British Columbia, Canada.

DESIGN

Using an interviewer-administered survey, we examined women for folate knowledge and the relation of folate knowledge to intake in a random sample. Contribution of folate from food, fortified grain products, and supplements was assessed by validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS PERFORMED

Descriptive statistics, t tests, Chi;(2), Pearson correlation analysis.

RESULTS

Mean daily folate intake from food, fortified foods, and supplementation was 812+/-710 Dietary Folate Equivalents (DFE)/day. Fortification of bread and grain products contributed 104+/-68 microg synthetic folic acid (SFA)/day (equal to 174+/-114 DFE), and supplements contributed 205+/-388 microg SFA/day. Although 86% of women met the Estimated Average Requirement (320 DFE/day) for folate, only 26% met the recommendation (400 microg SFA/day) for women capable of becoming pregnant. Most (95%) of the women had heard of folate, but only 25% knew that it could prevent birth defects. One-fourth of the women had good or very good knowledge of folate-rich foods. However, folate knowledge was not related to its intake. The most common sources of folate information were magazines/newspapers, doctors, and television/radio. Lack of awareness of the importance of folate was the most common reason given for choosing not to use folic acid supplements before pregnancy. However, 78% of the women indicated that, with knowledge of the benefits of folate, they would use supplemental folic acid daily to reduce the risk of birth defects.

APPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS

Educational strategies are required to increase folate awareness among women and to promote the benefits of periconceptional folic acid supplementation. Targeting physicians to educate women on the importance of folate could be a potentially successful route. J

Authors+Show Affiliations

Osteoporosis Research Program, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12589323

Citation

French, Melissa R., et al. "Folate Intakes and Awareness of Folate to Prevent Neural Tube Defects: a Survey of Women Living in Vancouver, Canada." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 103, no. 2, 2003, pp. 181-5.
French MR, Barr SI, Levy-Milne R. Folate intakes and awareness of folate to prevent neural tube defects: a survey of women living in Vancouver, Canada. J Am Diet Assoc. 2003;103(2):181-5.
French, M. R., Barr, S. I., & Levy-Milne, R. (2003). Folate intakes and awareness of folate to prevent neural tube defects: a survey of women living in Vancouver, Canada. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 103(2), 181-5.
French MR, Barr SI, Levy-Milne R. Folate Intakes and Awareness of Folate to Prevent Neural Tube Defects: a Survey of Women Living in Vancouver, Canada. J Am Diet Assoc. 2003;103(2):181-5. PubMed PMID: 12589323.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Folate intakes and awareness of folate to prevent neural tube defects: a survey of women living in Vancouver, Canada. AU - French,Melissa R, AU - Barr,Susan I, AU - Levy-Milne,Ryna, PY - 2003/2/18/pubmed PY - 2003/3/26/medline PY - 2003/2/18/entrez SP - 181 EP - 5 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 103 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To estimate folate intake and knowledge in women of childbearing age, in relation to risk of neural tube defects. SUBJECTS/SETTING: One hundred forty-eight women (aged 18 to 45 years) in the Vancouver area of British Columbia, Canada. DESIGN: Using an interviewer-administered survey, we examined women for folate knowledge and the relation of folate knowledge to intake in a random sample. Contribution of folate from food, fortified grain products, and supplements was assessed by validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS PERFORMED: Descriptive statistics, t tests, Chi;(2), Pearson correlation analysis. RESULTS: Mean daily folate intake from food, fortified foods, and supplementation was 812+/-710 Dietary Folate Equivalents (DFE)/day. Fortification of bread and grain products contributed 104+/-68 microg synthetic folic acid (SFA)/day (equal to 174+/-114 DFE), and supplements contributed 205+/-388 microg SFA/day. Although 86% of women met the Estimated Average Requirement (320 DFE/day) for folate, only 26% met the recommendation (400 microg SFA/day) for women capable of becoming pregnant. Most (95%) of the women had heard of folate, but only 25% knew that it could prevent birth defects. One-fourth of the women had good or very good knowledge of folate-rich foods. However, folate knowledge was not related to its intake. The most common sources of folate information were magazines/newspapers, doctors, and television/radio. Lack of awareness of the importance of folate was the most common reason given for choosing not to use folic acid supplements before pregnancy. However, 78% of the women indicated that, with knowledge of the benefits of folate, they would use supplemental folic acid daily to reduce the risk of birth defects. APPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS: Educational strategies are required to increase folate awareness among women and to promote the benefits of periconceptional folic acid supplementation. Targeting physicians to educate women on the importance of folate could be a potentially successful route. J SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12589323/Folate_intakes_and_awareness_of_folate_to_prevent_neural_tube_defects:_a_survey_of_women_living_in_Vancouver_Canada_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002822303000117 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -