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Peace test: is war sometimes a better solution? Survey of students of Zagreb and Mostar Schools of Medicine.
Croat Med J. 2003 Feb; 44(1):36-40.CM

Abstract

AIM

To investigate the differences among medical students from two medical schools, one in Zagreb, Croatia, and the other in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina, in their affinity towards peaceful vs violent way of solving conflicts.

METHODS

A total of 733 students from the Zagreb and 102 medical students from the Mostar University School of Medicine filled out an anonymous questionnaire during their enrollment into the next academic year. The questionnaire consisted of 10 Likert-type questions with 1-5 answer scale, which were designed to give an illustration of students' attitude towards war. The test score was calculated as the sum of all answers x 2+20. The total score ranged from minimum 40 to maximum 120 points, with a higher score indicating stronger inclination toward peaceful way of solving conflicts.

RESULTS

There was no difference between the mean total scores of Zagreb and Mostar students (66-/+17 and 67-/+18, respectively; p=0.744). The mean score of female students was higher than that of male students (71-/+19 vs 63-/+16; p<0.001) for the whole sample as well as for Zagreb and Mostar samples separately (p<0.001 for both). The average score of 2.3-/+0.9 per question indicated that the students' choice was mostly undecided on war-prone activities. Younger students were more war-prone than older ones (p=0.008 for age, and p=0.024 and 0.013 for comparisons between students in earlier and later academic years). Students from cities that were affected by war but not severely damaged seemed less war-prone than students from cities that were either seriously damaged or not directly affected by war (p=0.032).

CONCLUSION

Women, older students, and students from cities that were under war threat but not seriously damaged showed to be more morally engaged towards peace.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Mostar University School of Medicine, 88000 Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12590427

Citation

MadZarac, Zoran, et al. "Peace Test: Is War Sometimes a Better Solution? Survey of Students of Zagreb and Mostar Schools of Medicine." Croatian Medical Journal, vol. 44, no. 1, 2003, pp. 36-40.
MadZarac Z, Barić A, Abdović S, et al. Peace test: is war sometimes a better solution? Survey of students of Zagreb and Mostar Schools of Medicine. Croat Med J. 2003;44(1):36-40.
MadZarac, Z., Barić, A., Abdović, S., & Marić, Z. (2003). Peace test: is war sometimes a better solution? Survey of students of Zagreb and Mostar Schools of Medicine. Croatian Medical Journal, 44(1), 36-40.
MadZarac Z, et al. Peace Test: Is War Sometimes a Better Solution? Survey of Students of Zagreb and Mostar Schools of Medicine. Croat Med J. 2003;44(1):36-40. PubMed PMID: 12590427.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Peace test: is war sometimes a better solution? Survey of students of Zagreb and Mostar Schools of Medicine. AU - MadZarac,Zoran, AU - Barić,Ada, AU - Abdović,Slaven, AU - Marić,Zeljka, PY - 2003/2/19/pubmed PY - 2003/4/4/medline PY - 2003/2/19/entrez SP - 36 EP - 40 JF - Croatian medical journal JO - Croat. Med. J. VL - 44 IS - 1 N2 - AIM: To investigate the differences among medical students from two medical schools, one in Zagreb, Croatia, and the other in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina, in their affinity towards peaceful vs violent way of solving conflicts. METHODS: A total of 733 students from the Zagreb and 102 medical students from the Mostar University School of Medicine filled out an anonymous questionnaire during their enrollment into the next academic year. The questionnaire consisted of 10 Likert-type questions with 1-5 answer scale, which were designed to give an illustration of students' attitude towards war. The test score was calculated as the sum of all answers x 2+20. The total score ranged from minimum 40 to maximum 120 points, with a higher score indicating stronger inclination toward peaceful way of solving conflicts. RESULTS: There was no difference between the mean total scores of Zagreb and Mostar students (66-/+17 and 67-/+18, respectively; p=0.744). The mean score of female students was higher than that of male students (71-/+19 vs 63-/+16; p<0.001) for the whole sample as well as for Zagreb and Mostar samples separately (p<0.001 for both). The average score of 2.3-/+0.9 per question indicated that the students' choice was mostly undecided on war-prone activities. Younger students were more war-prone than older ones (p=0.008 for age, and p=0.024 and 0.013 for comparisons between students in earlier and later academic years). Students from cities that were affected by war but not severely damaged seemed less war-prone than students from cities that were either seriously damaged or not directly affected by war (p=0.032). CONCLUSION: Women, older students, and students from cities that were under war threat but not seriously damaged showed to be more morally engaged towards peace. SN - 0353-9504 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12590427/Peace_test:_is_war_sometimes_a_better_solution_Survey_of_students_of_Zagreb_and_Mostar_Schools_of_Medicine_ L2 - http://www.cmj.hr/2003/44/1/12590427.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -