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Energy requirements of women of reproductive age.
Am J Clin Nutr 2003; 77(3):630-8AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The energy requirements of women have been based on total energy expenditure (TEE) derived from the factorial approach or as multiples of basal metabolic rate (BMR).

OBJECTIVE

This study was designed to reevaluate the energy requirements of healthy, moderately active underweight, normal-weight, and overweight women of reproductive age.

DESIGN

The energy requirements of 116 women [n = 13 with a low body mass index (BMI), n = 70 with a normal BMI, and n = 33 with a high BMI] were estimated from TEE measured by the doubly labeled water method. Twenty-four-hour EE and BMR were measured by room respiration calorimetry, activity EE was estimated from nonbasal EE as TEE - BMR, and physical activity level was calculated as TEE/BMR. Body composition was derived from a multicomponent model. Fitness, strength, and physical activity level were assessed, and fasting serum indexes were measured.

RESULTS

Energy requirements differed among the low-BMI (8.9 +/- 0.9 MJ/d), normal-BMI (10.1 +/- 1.4 MJ/d), and high-BMI (11.5 +/- 1.9 MJ/d) groups (P = 0.02-0.001, all pairwise comparisons). Major predictors of BMR, 24-h EE, and TEE were weight, height, and body composition; minor predictors were fasting metabolic profile and fitness. Fat-free mass and fat mass accounted for the differences in EE seen between the BMI groups. The mean physical activity level of 1.86 suggested that the multiples of BMR used to estimate energy requirements have been underestimated.

CONCLUSION

Recommended energy intakes for healthy, moderately active women of reproductive age living in industrialized societies should be revised on the basis of TEE.

Authors+Show Affiliations

US Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service, Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. nbutte@bcm.tmc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12600853

Citation

Butte, Nancy F., et al. "Energy Requirements of Women of Reproductive Age." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 77, no. 3, 2003, pp. 630-8.
Butte NF, Treuth MS, Mehta NR, et al. Energy requirements of women of reproductive age. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;77(3):630-8.
Butte, N. F., Treuth, M. S., Mehta, N. R., Wong, W. W., Hopkinson, J. M., & Smith, E. O. (2003). Energy requirements of women of reproductive age. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 77(3), pp. 630-8.
Butte NF, et al. Energy Requirements of Women of Reproductive Age. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;77(3):630-8. PubMed PMID: 12600853.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Energy requirements of women of reproductive age. AU - Butte,Nancy F, AU - Treuth,Margarita S, AU - Mehta,Nitesh R, AU - Wong,William W, AU - Hopkinson,Judy M, AU - Smith,E O'Brian, PY - 2003/2/26/pubmed PY - 2003/4/16/medline PY - 2003/2/26/entrez SP - 630 EP - 8 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 77 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The energy requirements of women have been based on total energy expenditure (TEE) derived from the factorial approach or as multiples of basal metabolic rate (BMR). OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to reevaluate the energy requirements of healthy, moderately active underweight, normal-weight, and overweight women of reproductive age. DESIGN: The energy requirements of 116 women [n = 13 with a low body mass index (BMI), n = 70 with a normal BMI, and n = 33 with a high BMI] were estimated from TEE measured by the doubly labeled water method. Twenty-four-hour EE and BMR were measured by room respiration calorimetry, activity EE was estimated from nonbasal EE as TEE - BMR, and physical activity level was calculated as TEE/BMR. Body composition was derived from a multicomponent model. Fitness, strength, and physical activity level were assessed, and fasting serum indexes were measured. RESULTS: Energy requirements differed among the low-BMI (8.9 +/- 0.9 MJ/d), normal-BMI (10.1 +/- 1.4 MJ/d), and high-BMI (11.5 +/- 1.9 MJ/d) groups (P = 0.02-0.001, all pairwise comparisons). Major predictors of BMR, 24-h EE, and TEE were weight, height, and body composition; minor predictors were fasting metabolic profile and fitness. Fat-free mass and fat mass accounted for the differences in EE seen between the BMI groups. The mean physical activity level of 1.86 suggested that the multiples of BMR used to estimate energy requirements have been underestimated. CONCLUSION: Recommended energy intakes for healthy, moderately active women of reproductive age living in industrialized societies should be revised on the basis of TEE. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12600853/Energy_requirements_of_women_of_reproductive_age_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/77.3.630 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -