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Hepatitis E and its emergence in non-endemic areas.
Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2002 Aug 30; 114(15-16):663-70.WK

Abstract

In areas with a tropical or subtropical climate and poor sanitary conditions, hepatitis E is the major cause of enterically transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis, and is responsible for both waterborne outbreaks of variable magnitude and sporadic cases of acute hepatitis. The causative agent is the hepatitis E virus (HEV), a non-enveloped, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA molecule of approximately 7.2 kb in length. Recently, HEV strains have been isolated from swine in industrialized countries. In addition, cases of acute hepatitis due to novel HEV variants have been reported in humans without recognized risk factors for hepatitis E in the US, Japan and Europe. Some of the novel strains were found to be closely related to swine HEV isolates from the same area, suggesting that hepatitis E is a zoonotic disease. Thus hepatitis E is becoming an issue in countries where HEV is not, traditionally, believed to be endemic. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the transmission, structure and biology of the virus as well as diagnosis of the infection, and describes the present status in areas with a low incidence of acute hepatitis E.

Authors+Show Affiliations

2nd Medical Department, General Hospital, Graz, Austria. Harald.Worm@klinikum-graz.atNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12602109

Citation

Worm, Harald C., et al. "Hepatitis E and Its Emergence in Non-endemic Areas." Wiener Klinische Wochenschrift, vol. 114, no. 15-16, 2002, pp. 663-70.
Worm HC, Schlauder GG, Brandstätter G. Hepatitis E and its emergence in non-endemic areas. Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2002;114(15-16):663-70.
Worm, H. C., Schlauder, G. G., & Brandstätter, G. (2002). Hepatitis E and its emergence in non-endemic areas. Wiener Klinische Wochenschrift, 114(15-16), 663-70.
Worm HC, Schlauder GG, Brandstätter G. Hepatitis E and Its Emergence in Non-endemic Areas. Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2002 Aug 30;114(15-16):663-70. PubMed PMID: 12602109.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hepatitis E and its emergence in non-endemic areas. AU - Worm,Harald C, AU - Schlauder,George G, AU - Brandstätter,Gerald, PY - 2003/2/27/pubmed PY - 2003/5/23/medline PY - 2003/2/27/entrez SP - 663 EP - 70 JF - Wiener klinische Wochenschrift JO - Wien Klin Wochenschr VL - 114 IS - 15-16 N2 - In areas with a tropical or subtropical climate and poor sanitary conditions, hepatitis E is the major cause of enterically transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis, and is responsible for both waterborne outbreaks of variable magnitude and sporadic cases of acute hepatitis. The causative agent is the hepatitis E virus (HEV), a non-enveloped, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA molecule of approximately 7.2 kb in length. Recently, HEV strains have been isolated from swine in industrialized countries. In addition, cases of acute hepatitis due to novel HEV variants have been reported in humans without recognized risk factors for hepatitis E in the US, Japan and Europe. Some of the novel strains were found to be closely related to swine HEV isolates from the same area, suggesting that hepatitis E is a zoonotic disease. Thus hepatitis E is becoming an issue in countries where HEV is not, traditionally, believed to be endemic. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the transmission, structure and biology of the virus as well as diagnosis of the infection, and describes the present status in areas with a low incidence of acute hepatitis E. SN - 0043-5325 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12602109/Hepatitis_E_and_its_emergence_in_non_endemic_areas_ L2 - https://ClinicalTrials.gov/search/term=12602109 [PUBMED-IDS] DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -