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Risk factors for iron deficiency in a hospitalized urban New Zealand population.
J Paediatr Child Health. 2003 Mar; 39(2):100-6.JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine which dietary practices and sociodemographic factors are associated with iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) and iron deficiency (ID) in hospitalized New Zealand children.

METHODOLOGY

A prospective study of children 8-23 months of age hospitalized with an acute illness from 1997 to 1999. Iron deficiency was defined as abnormal values for two out of three of serum ferritin (< 10 micro g/L), serum iron saturation (< 10%) and red cell distribution width (> 14.5%). Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) was defined as ID + serum haemoglobin concentration <110 g/L. Those with IDA or ID were compared separately with those who were not iron deficient.

RESULTS

Three hundred and ninety-one children were enrolled. Two hundred and twenty had IDA, 73 had ID and 98 were not iron deficient. In a multivariate analysis, those children who had a diagnosis of pneumonia (odds ratio 4.43, 95% CI 1.49, 13.13) were Pacific (odds ratio 6.31, 95% CI 2.14, 18.63), were currently drinking breast milk (odds ratio 10.22, 95% CI 2.95, 35.42), had a mother who restricted her meat intake during pregnancy (odds ratio 4.40, 95% CI 1.53, 12.64) or lived in a household with more than three children (odds ratio 7.42, 95% CI 1.88, 29.34) were at increased risk of IDA. Those children who were Pacific (odds ratio 5.44, 95% CI 1.37, 21.65) or who drank tea (odds ratio 7.88, 95% CI 1.10, 56.33) were at increased risk of ID. Those with a diagnosis of gastroenteritis (odds ratio 0.16, 95% CI 0.03, 0.75) were at decreased risk of ID.

CONCLUSIONS

Both dietary and non-dietary factors are associated with an increased risk of IDA and ID in New Zealand children. In this hospitalized sample, more non-dietary than dietary factors were associated with poor iron status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, New Zealand. cc.grant@auckland.ac.nzNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12603797

Citation

Grant, C C., et al. "Risk Factors for Iron Deficiency in a Hospitalized Urban New Zealand Population." Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, vol. 39, no. 2, 2003, pp. 100-6.
Grant CC, Wall CR, Wilson C, et al. Risk factors for iron deficiency in a hospitalized urban New Zealand population. J Paediatr Child Health. 2003;39(2):100-6.
Grant, C. C., Wall, C. R., Wilson, C., & Taua, N. (2003). Risk factors for iron deficiency in a hospitalized urban New Zealand population. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 39(2), 100-6.
Grant CC, et al. Risk Factors for Iron Deficiency in a Hospitalized Urban New Zealand Population. J Paediatr Child Health. 2003;39(2):100-6. PubMed PMID: 12603797.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk factors for iron deficiency in a hospitalized urban New Zealand population. AU - Grant,C C, AU - Wall,C R, AU - Wilson,C, AU - Taua,N, PY - 2003/2/27/pubmed PY - 2003/7/2/medline PY - 2003/2/27/entrez SP - 100 EP - 6 JF - Journal of paediatrics and child health JO - J Paediatr Child Health VL - 39 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine which dietary practices and sociodemographic factors are associated with iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) and iron deficiency (ID) in hospitalized New Zealand children. METHODOLOGY: A prospective study of children 8-23 months of age hospitalized with an acute illness from 1997 to 1999. Iron deficiency was defined as abnormal values for two out of three of serum ferritin (< 10 micro g/L), serum iron saturation (< 10%) and red cell distribution width (> 14.5%). Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) was defined as ID + serum haemoglobin concentration <110 g/L. Those with IDA or ID were compared separately with those who were not iron deficient. RESULTS: Three hundred and ninety-one children were enrolled. Two hundred and twenty had IDA, 73 had ID and 98 were not iron deficient. In a multivariate analysis, those children who had a diagnosis of pneumonia (odds ratio 4.43, 95% CI 1.49, 13.13) were Pacific (odds ratio 6.31, 95% CI 2.14, 18.63), were currently drinking breast milk (odds ratio 10.22, 95% CI 2.95, 35.42), had a mother who restricted her meat intake during pregnancy (odds ratio 4.40, 95% CI 1.53, 12.64) or lived in a household with more than three children (odds ratio 7.42, 95% CI 1.88, 29.34) were at increased risk of IDA. Those children who were Pacific (odds ratio 5.44, 95% CI 1.37, 21.65) or who drank tea (odds ratio 7.88, 95% CI 1.10, 56.33) were at increased risk of ID. Those with a diagnosis of gastroenteritis (odds ratio 0.16, 95% CI 0.03, 0.75) were at decreased risk of ID. CONCLUSIONS: Both dietary and non-dietary factors are associated with an increased risk of IDA and ID in New Zealand children. In this hospitalized sample, more non-dietary than dietary factors were associated with poor iron status. SN - 1034-4810 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12603797/Risk_factors_for_iron_deficiency_in_a_hospitalized_urban_New_Zealand_population_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=1034-4810&amp;date=2003&amp;volume=39&amp;issue=2&amp;spage=100 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -