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Differential changes in human pharyngoesophageal motor excitability induced by swallowing, pharyngeal stimulation, and anesthesia.
Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2003 Jul; 285(1):G137-44.AJ

Abstract

We investigated the effects of water swallowing, pharyngeal stimulation, and oropharyngeal anesthesia on corticobulbar and craniobulbar projections to human swallowing musculature. Changes in pathway excitability were measured via electromyography from swallowed intraluminal pharyngeal and esophageal electrodes to motor cerebral and trigeminal nerve magnetic stimulation. After both water swallowing and pharyngeal stimulation, pharyngoesophageal corticobulbar excitability increased (swallowing: pharynx = 59 +/- 12%, P < 0.001; esophagus = 45 +/- 20%, P < 0.05; pharyngeal stimulation: pharynx = 76 +/- 19%, P < 0.001; esophagus = 45 +/- 23%, P = 0.05), being early with swallowing but late with stimulation. By comparison, craniobulbar excitability increased early after swallowing but remained unaffected by pharyngeal stimulation. After anesthesia, both corticobulbar (pharynx =-24 +/- 10%, P < 0.05; esophagus = -28 +/- 7%, P < 0.01) and craniobulbar excitability showed a late decrease. Thus swallowing induces transient early facilitation of corticobulbar and craniobulbar projections, whereas electrical stimulation promotes delayed facilitation mainly in cortex. With removal of input, both corticobulbar and craniobulbar projections show delayed inhibition, implying a reduction in motoneuron and/or cortical activity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastrointestinal Science, University of Manchester, Hope Hospital, Eccles Old Road, Salford M6 8HD, England.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12606304

Citation

Fraser, Christopher, et al. "Differential Changes in Human Pharyngoesophageal Motor Excitability Induced By Swallowing, Pharyngeal Stimulation, and Anesthesia." American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, vol. 285, no. 1, 2003, pp. G137-44.
Fraser C, Rothwell J, Power M, et al. Differential changes in human pharyngoesophageal motor excitability induced by swallowing, pharyngeal stimulation, and anesthesia. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2003;285(1):G137-44.
Fraser, C., Rothwell, J., Power, M., Hobson, A., Thompson, D., & Hamdy, S. (2003). Differential changes in human pharyngoesophageal motor excitability induced by swallowing, pharyngeal stimulation, and anesthesia. American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, 285(1), G137-44.
Fraser C, et al. Differential Changes in Human Pharyngoesophageal Motor Excitability Induced By Swallowing, Pharyngeal Stimulation, and Anesthesia. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2003;285(1):G137-44. PubMed PMID: 12606304.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differential changes in human pharyngoesophageal motor excitability induced by swallowing, pharyngeal stimulation, and anesthesia. AU - Fraser,Christopher, AU - Rothwell,John, AU - Power,Maxine, AU - Hobson,Anthony, AU - Thompson,David, AU - Hamdy,Shaheen, Y1 - 2003/02/26/ PY - 2003/2/28/pubmed PY - 2003/7/25/medline PY - 2003/2/28/entrez SP - G137 EP - 44 JF - American journal of physiology. Gastrointestinal and liver physiology JO - Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol VL - 285 IS - 1 N2 - We investigated the effects of water swallowing, pharyngeal stimulation, and oropharyngeal anesthesia on corticobulbar and craniobulbar projections to human swallowing musculature. Changes in pathway excitability were measured via electromyography from swallowed intraluminal pharyngeal and esophageal electrodes to motor cerebral and trigeminal nerve magnetic stimulation. After both water swallowing and pharyngeal stimulation, pharyngoesophageal corticobulbar excitability increased (swallowing: pharynx = 59 +/- 12%, P < 0.001; esophagus = 45 +/- 20%, P < 0.05; pharyngeal stimulation: pharynx = 76 +/- 19%, P < 0.001; esophagus = 45 +/- 23%, P = 0.05), being early with swallowing but late with stimulation. By comparison, craniobulbar excitability increased early after swallowing but remained unaffected by pharyngeal stimulation. After anesthesia, both corticobulbar (pharynx =-24 +/- 10%, P < 0.05; esophagus = -28 +/- 7%, P < 0.01) and craniobulbar excitability showed a late decrease. Thus swallowing induces transient early facilitation of corticobulbar and craniobulbar projections, whereas electrical stimulation promotes delayed facilitation mainly in cortex. With removal of input, both corticobulbar and craniobulbar projections show delayed inhibition, implying a reduction in motoneuron and/or cortical activity. SN - 0193-1857 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12606304/Differential_changes_in_human_pharyngoesophageal_motor_excitability_induced_by_swallowing_pharyngeal_stimulation_and_anesthesia_ L2 - https://journals.physiology.org/doi/10.1152/ajpgi.00399.2002?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -