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Association between HIV-1 infection, the etiology of genital ulcer disease, and response to syndromic management.
Sex Transm Dis. 2003 Mar; 30(3):241-5.ST

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Reports on the effect of HIV-1 infection on healing rates of ulcers are conflicting.

GOAL

The goal was to determine the etiology and response to treatment of genital ulcer disease (GUD) in relation to HIV-1 infection.

STUDY DESIGN

This was a cohort study of patients with GUD treated with local syndromic management protocols.

RESULTS

Among the 587 recruited, the prevalences of infections due to HSV, Treponema pallidum, Chlamydia trachomatis (lymphogranuloma venereum [LGV]), Haemophilus ducreyi, Calymmatobacterium granulomatis, and HIV-1 were 48%, 14%, 11%, 10%, 1%, and 75%, respectively. The prevalence T. pallidum of was higher among men (P = 0.03), and an association was seen among HIV-1-seronegatives on univariate and multivariate analyses (P < 0.001; = 0.01). The prevalence of C trachomatis (LGV) was higher among females (P = 0.004), and an association was seen among HIV-1-seropositives on univariate analysis (P = 0.04). At follow-up, 40/407 (10%) showed a decreased healing tendency, not associated with ulcer etiology or HIV-1 seropositivity.

CONCLUSION

Response to syndromic management of GUD was acceptable and not associated with HIV-1 coinfection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of Natal, Durban, South Africa.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12616144

Citation

Moodley, Prashini, et al. "Association Between HIV-1 Infection, the Etiology of Genital Ulcer Disease, and Response to Syndromic Management." Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 30, no. 3, 2003, pp. 241-5.
Moodley P, Sturm PD, Vanmali T, et al. Association between HIV-1 infection, the etiology of genital ulcer disease, and response to syndromic management. Sex Transm Dis. 2003;30(3):241-5.
Moodley, P., Sturm, P. D., Vanmali, T., Wilkinson, D., Connolly, C., & Sturm, A. W. (2003). Association between HIV-1 infection, the etiology of genital ulcer disease, and response to syndromic management. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 30(3), 241-5.
Moodley P, et al. Association Between HIV-1 Infection, the Etiology of Genital Ulcer Disease, and Response to Syndromic Management. Sex Transm Dis. 2003;30(3):241-5. PubMed PMID: 12616144.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between HIV-1 infection, the etiology of genital ulcer disease, and response to syndromic management. AU - Moodley,Prashini, AU - Sturm,Patrick D J, AU - Vanmali,Trusha, AU - Wilkinson,David, AU - Connolly,Cathy, AU - Sturm,A Willem, PY - 2003/3/5/pubmed PY - 2003/5/23/medline PY - 2003/3/5/entrez SP - 241 EP - 5 JF - Sexually transmitted diseases JO - Sex Transm Dis VL - 30 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Reports on the effect of HIV-1 infection on healing rates of ulcers are conflicting. GOAL: The goal was to determine the etiology and response to treatment of genital ulcer disease (GUD) in relation to HIV-1 infection. STUDY DESIGN: This was a cohort study of patients with GUD treated with local syndromic management protocols. RESULTS: Among the 587 recruited, the prevalences of infections due to HSV, Treponema pallidum, Chlamydia trachomatis (lymphogranuloma venereum [LGV]), Haemophilus ducreyi, Calymmatobacterium granulomatis, and HIV-1 were 48%, 14%, 11%, 10%, 1%, and 75%, respectively. The prevalence T. pallidum of was higher among men (P = 0.03), and an association was seen among HIV-1-seronegatives on univariate and multivariate analyses (P < 0.001; = 0.01). The prevalence of C trachomatis (LGV) was higher among females (P = 0.004), and an association was seen among HIV-1-seropositives on univariate analysis (P = 0.04). At follow-up, 40/407 (10%) showed a decreased healing tendency, not associated with ulcer etiology or HIV-1 seropositivity. CONCLUSION: Response to syndromic management of GUD was acceptable and not associated with HIV-1 coinfection. SN - 0148-5717 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12616144/Association_between_HIV-1_infection,_the_etiology_of_genital_ulcer_disease,_and_response_to_syndromic_management. L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/00007435-200303000-00013 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -