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Serum lipids and age-related lens opacities: a longitudinal investigation: the Framingham Studies.
Ophthalmology 2003; 110(3):578-83O

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate whether serum lipid/lipoprotein levels are independent risk factors for nuclear, cortical, or posterior subcapsular (PSC) cataracts.

DESIGN

Case-control study nested in a cohort study.

PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS

Eye examinations were conducted on surviving members of the Framingham Offspring Heart Study cohort from 1989 to 1991 (Framingham Offspring Eye Study) to determine cataract case-control status. Data from the Framingham Offspring Heart Study, including fasting serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride measurements collected first in 1971, again approximately 8 years later, and approximately every 4 years thereafter were used to examine associations between lipid levels (mean levels across examinations and slope of measurements over time) and the presence of specific cataract types. The multistage analyses included 1869 persons aged 45 years and older.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

A standardized grading system was used to grade cortical, nuclear, and PSC cataracts.

RESULTS

The median age of participants was 55 years; 49% were males. In multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders, fasting hypertriglyceridemia (>/=250 mg/dl) was associated with an increased risk of PSC cataract in men (P = 0.02). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels </=35 mg/dl were associated with PSC cataract in men at a borderline level of significance (P = 0.09). No associations were noted between serum lipid/lipoprotein variables and risk of cortical or nuclear cataract.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings suggest that hypertriglyceridemia, a potentially modifiable factor, is associated with the development of PSC cataract in men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Research, National Eye Institute, Building 31 Room 6A52, 31 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-2510, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12623825

Citation

Hiller, Rita, et al. "Serum Lipids and Age-related Lens Opacities: a Longitudinal Investigation: the Framingham Studies." Ophthalmology, vol. 110, no. 3, 2003, pp. 578-83.
Hiller R, Sperduto RD, Reed GF, et al. Serum lipids and age-related lens opacities: a longitudinal investigation: the Framingham Studies. Ophthalmology. 2003;110(3):578-83.
Hiller, R., Sperduto, R. D., Reed, G. F., D'Agostino, R. B., & Wilson, P. W. (2003). Serum lipids and age-related lens opacities: a longitudinal investigation: the Framingham Studies. Ophthalmology, 110(3), pp. 578-83.
Hiller R, et al. Serum Lipids and Age-related Lens Opacities: a Longitudinal Investigation: the Framingham Studies. Ophthalmology. 2003;110(3):578-83. PubMed PMID: 12623825.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum lipids and age-related lens opacities: a longitudinal investigation: the Framingham Studies. AU - Hiller,Rita, AU - Sperduto,Robert D, AU - Reed,George F, AU - D'Agostino,Ralph B, AU - Wilson,Peter W F, PY - 2003/3/8/pubmed PY - 2003/3/26/medline PY - 2003/3/8/entrez SP - 578 EP - 83 JF - Ophthalmology JO - Ophthalmology VL - 110 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether serum lipid/lipoprotein levels are independent risk factors for nuclear, cortical, or posterior subcapsular (PSC) cataracts. DESIGN: Case-control study nested in a cohort study. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Eye examinations were conducted on surviving members of the Framingham Offspring Heart Study cohort from 1989 to 1991 (Framingham Offspring Eye Study) to determine cataract case-control status. Data from the Framingham Offspring Heart Study, including fasting serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride measurements collected first in 1971, again approximately 8 years later, and approximately every 4 years thereafter were used to examine associations between lipid levels (mean levels across examinations and slope of measurements over time) and the presence of specific cataract types. The multistage analyses included 1869 persons aged 45 years and older. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A standardized grading system was used to grade cortical, nuclear, and PSC cataracts. RESULTS: The median age of participants was 55 years; 49% were males. In multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders, fasting hypertriglyceridemia (>/=250 mg/dl) was associated with an increased risk of PSC cataract in men (P = 0.02). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels </=35 mg/dl were associated with PSC cataract in men at a borderline level of significance (P = 0.09). No associations were noted between serum lipid/lipoprotein variables and risk of cortical or nuclear cataract. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that hypertriglyceridemia, a potentially modifiable factor, is associated with the development of PSC cataract in men. SN - 0161-6420 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12623825/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0161-6420(02)01762-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -