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"Stress" and coronary heart disease: psychosocial risk factors.

Abstract

An Expert Working Group of the National Heart Foundation of Australia undertook a review of systematic reviews of the evidence relating to major psychosocial risk factors to assess whether there are independent associations between any of the factors and the development and progression of coronary heart disease (CHD), or the occurrence of acute cardiac events. The expert group concluded that (i) there is strong and consistent evidence of an independent causal association between depression, social isolation and lack of quality social support and the causes and prognosis of CHD; and (ii) there is no strong or consistent evidence for a causal association between chronic life events, work-related stressors (job control, demands and strain), Type A behaviour patterns, hostility, anxiety disorders or panic disorders and CHD. The increased risk contributed by these psychosocial factors is of similar order to the more conventional CHD risk factors such as smoking, dyslipidaemia and hypertension. The identified psychosocial risk factors should be taken into account during individual CHD risk assessment and management, and have implications for public health policy and research.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    National Heart Foundation, 411 King Street, West Melbourne, VIC 3003, Australia. steve.bunker@heartfoundation.com.au

    , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    The Medical journal of Australia 178:6 2003 Mar 17 pg 272-6

    MeSH

    Anxiety Disorders
    Coronary Disease
    Depression
    Hostility
    Humans
    Hyperlipidemias
    Hypertension
    Life Change Events
    Panic Disorder
    Prognosis
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors
    Smoking
    Social Isolation
    Social Support
    Stress, Psychological
    Type A Personality
    Work

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12633484

    Citation

    Bunker, Stephen J., et al. ""Stress" and Coronary Heart Disease: Psychosocial Risk Factors." The Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 178, no. 6, 2003, pp. 272-6.
    Bunker SJ, Colquhoun DM, Esler MD, et al. "Stress" and coronary heart disease: psychosocial risk factors. Med J Aust. 2003;178(6):272-6.
    Bunker, S. J., Colquhoun, D. M., Esler, M. D., Hickie, I. B., Hunt, D., Jelinek, V. M., ... Tonkin, A. M. (2003). "Stress" and coronary heart disease: psychosocial risk factors. The Medical Journal of Australia, 178(6), pp. 272-6.
    Bunker SJ, et al. "Stress" and Coronary Heart Disease: Psychosocial Risk Factors. Med J Aust. 2003 Mar 17;178(6):272-6. PubMed PMID: 12633484.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - "Stress" and coronary heart disease: psychosocial risk factors. AU - Bunker,Stephen J, AU - Colquhoun,David M, AU - Esler,Murray D, AU - Hickie,Ian B, AU - Hunt,David, AU - Jelinek,V Michael, AU - Oldenburg,Brian F, AU - Peach,Hedley G, AU - Ruth,Denise, AU - Tennant,Christopher C, AU - Tonkin,Andrew M, PY - 2002/07/02/received PY - 2003/01/31/accepted PY - 2003/3/14/pubmed PY - 2003/6/18/medline PY - 2003/3/14/entrez SP - 272 EP - 6 JF - The Medical journal of Australia JO - Med. J. Aust. VL - 178 IS - 6 N2 - An Expert Working Group of the National Heart Foundation of Australia undertook a review of systematic reviews of the evidence relating to major psychosocial risk factors to assess whether there are independent associations between any of the factors and the development and progression of coronary heart disease (CHD), or the occurrence of acute cardiac events. The expert group concluded that (i) there is strong and consistent evidence of an independent causal association between depression, social isolation and lack of quality social support and the causes and prognosis of CHD; and (ii) there is no strong or consistent evidence for a causal association between chronic life events, work-related stressors (job control, demands and strain), Type A behaviour patterns, hostility, anxiety disorders or panic disorders and CHD. The increased risk contributed by these psychosocial factors is of similar order to the more conventional CHD risk factors such as smoking, dyslipidaemia and hypertension. The identified psychosocial risk factors should be taken into account during individual CHD risk assessment and management, and have implications for public health policy and research. SN - 0025-729X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12633484/"Stress"_and_coronary_heart_disease:_psychosocial_risk_factors_ L2 - https://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/178_06_170303/bun10421_fm.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -