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Self-reported heavy bleeding associated with uterine leiomyomata.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize the relationship between self-reported bleeding symptoms and uterine leiomyoma size and location.

METHODS

The leiomyoma status of a randomly selected sample of women aged 35-49 in the Washington, DC, area was determined using abdominal and transvaginal ultrasound to measure size and location of leiomyomata found at screening. Women were asked about symptoms of heavy bleeding (gushing-type bleeding, long menses, pad/tampon use) in a telephone interview. Using multivariable regression, we examined the relationships between leiomyoma characteristics and heavy bleeding symptoms among 910 premenopausal women.

RESULTS

Women with leiomyomata (n = 596) were more likely to report gushing-type bleeding than women without leiomyomata; risk increased with leiomyoma size. Adjusted relative risks with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for women in each leiomyoma size category compared with the reference category (women without leiomyomata) were as follows: adjusted relative risk of 1.4 (95% CI 1.1, 1.9) for diffuse only, adjusted relative risk of 1.4 (95% CI 1.1, 1.8) for small leiomyomata (less than 2 cm), adjusted relative risk of 1.6 (95% CI 1.3, 2.0) for medium leiomyomata (2-5 cm), and adjusted relative risk of 1.9 (95% CI 1.5, 2.5) for large leiomyomata (greater than 5 cm). Reported use of eight or more pads/tampons on the heaviest days of menstrual bleeding increased with leiomyoma size, with a nearly 2.5-fold risk for women with large leiomyomata compared with women without leiomyomata (adjusted relative risk of 2.4; 95% CI 1.8, 3.1). Nonsubmucosal leiomyomata were associated with essentially the same increase in heavy bleeding as submuscosal leiomyomata of similar size.

CONCLUSION

Small leiomyomata were associated with increased risk of heavy bleeding, and risk increased with size. Contrary to published articles, nonsubmucosal leiomyomata were associated with heavy bleeding to the same extent as submucosal leiomyomata.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. wegienka@niehs.nih.gov

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    Obstetrics and gynecology 101:3 2003 Mar pg 431-7

    MeSH

    Adult
    Age Distribution
    District of Columbia
    Female
    Humans
    Interviews as Topic
    Leiomyoma
    Medical Records
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Risk Factors
    Ultrasonography
    Uterine Hemorrhage
    Uterine Neoplasms

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12636944

    Citation

    Wegienka, Ganesa, et al. "Self-reported Heavy Bleeding Associated With Uterine Leiomyomata." Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 101, no. 3, 2003, pp. 431-7.
    Wegienka G, Baird DD, Hertz-Picciotto I, et al. Self-reported heavy bleeding associated with uterine leiomyomata. Obstet Gynecol. 2003;101(3):431-7.
    Wegienka, G., Baird, D. D., Hertz-Picciotto, I., Harlow, S. D., Steege, J. F., Hill, M. C., ... Hartmann, K. E. (2003). Self-reported heavy bleeding associated with uterine leiomyomata. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 101(3), pp. 431-7.
    Wegienka G, et al. Self-reported Heavy Bleeding Associated With Uterine Leiomyomata. Obstet Gynecol. 2003;101(3):431-7. PubMed PMID: 12636944.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Self-reported heavy bleeding associated with uterine leiomyomata. AU - Wegienka,Ganesa, AU - Baird,Donna Day, AU - Hertz-Picciotto,Irva, AU - Harlow,Siobán D, AU - Steege,John F, AU - Hill,Michael C, AU - Schectman,Joel M, AU - Hartmann,Katherine E, PY - 2003/3/15/pubmed PY - 2003/4/4/medline PY - 2003/3/15/entrez SP - 431 EP - 7 JF - Obstetrics and gynecology JO - Obstet Gynecol VL - 101 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To characterize the relationship between self-reported bleeding symptoms and uterine leiomyoma size and location. METHODS: The leiomyoma status of a randomly selected sample of women aged 35-49 in the Washington, DC, area was determined using abdominal and transvaginal ultrasound to measure size and location of leiomyomata found at screening. Women were asked about symptoms of heavy bleeding (gushing-type bleeding, long menses, pad/tampon use) in a telephone interview. Using multivariable regression, we examined the relationships between leiomyoma characteristics and heavy bleeding symptoms among 910 premenopausal women. RESULTS: Women with leiomyomata (n = 596) were more likely to report gushing-type bleeding than women without leiomyomata; risk increased with leiomyoma size. Adjusted relative risks with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for women in each leiomyoma size category compared with the reference category (women without leiomyomata) were as follows: adjusted relative risk of 1.4 (95% CI 1.1, 1.9) for diffuse only, adjusted relative risk of 1.4 (95% CI 1.1, 1.8) for small leiomyomata (less than 2 cm), adjusted relative risk of 1.6 (95% CI 1.3, 2.0) for medium leiomyomata (2-5 cm), and adjusted relative risk of 1.9 (95% CI 1.5, 2.5) for large leiomyomata (greater than 5 cm). Reported use of eight or more pads/tampons on the heaviest days of menstrual bleeding increased with leiomyoma size, with a nearly 2.5-fold risk for women with large leiomyomata compared with women without leiomyomata (adjusted relative risk of 2.4; 95% CI 1.8, 3.1). Nonsubmucosal leiomyomata were associated with essentially the same increase in heavy bleeding as submuscosal leiomyomata of similar size. CONCLUSION: Small leiomyomata were associated with increased risk of heavy bleeding, and risk increased with size. Contrary to published articles, nonsubmucosal leiomyomata were associated with heavy bleeding to the same extent as submucosal leiomyomata. SN - 0029-7844 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12636944/Self_reported_heavy_bleeding_associated_with_uterine_leiomyomata_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0029784402031216 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -