Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The status of plasma homocysteine and related B-vitamins in healthy young vegetarians and nonvegetarians.
Eur J Nutr 2003; 42(2):84-90EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Exclusion of animal products and having only plant protein in vegetarian diets may affect the status of certain B-vitamins, and further cause the elevation of plasma homocysteine concentration.

AIM

The purpose of this study was to assess the status of homocysteine and related B-vitamins in vegetarians and nonvegetarians. The effects of biochemical parameters of B-vitamins and dietary protein on plasma homocysteine were also examined.

METHODS

The study was performed at the Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, in the central part of Taiwan. Thirty-seven vegetarians (28.9 +/- 5.5 y) and 32 nonvegetarians (22.9 +/- 1.6 y) were recruited. Nutrient intake was recorded using 3-day dietary records. Fasting venous blood samples were obtained. Plasma homocysteine, folate and vitamin B-12 were measured. Vitamin B-6 status was assessed by direct measures [plasma pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and urinary 4-pyridoxic acid (4-PA)] and indirect measures [erythrocyte alanine (EALT-AC) and aspartate (EAST-AC) aminotransaminase activity coefficient].

RESULTS

There was no significant difference in vitamin B-6 intake between the two groups, although the vegetarian group had a significantly lower vitamin B-12 intake than the nonvegetarian group. Vegetarian subjects had significantly lower mean plasma PLP and vitamin B-12 concentrations than did nonvegetarian subjects (p < 0.05); however, a significantly higher mean plasma folate concentration was found in the vegetarian group. Vegetarian subjects had a significantly higher mean plasma homocysteine concentration than nonvegetarian subjects (13.2 +/- 7.9 vs. 9.8 +/- 2.2 micromol/L). Negative correlations were seen between plasma homocysteine and vitamin B-12 concentrations in the vegetarian (p = 0.004), nonvegetarian (p = 0.026), and pooled (p < 0.001) groups. From best subsets regression analyses, the plasma homocysteine concentration could be significantly predicted by total protein intake (p = 0.027) and plasma vitamin B-12 concentration (p = 0.005) in the pooled group. When the intake of protein is not considered, vitamin B-12 concentration is still a strong predictor of plasma homocysteine concentration (p = 0.012).

CONCLUSIONS

Vitamin B-12 intake and mean plasma vitamin B-12 concentration were lower for vegetarian subjects than for nonvegetarian subjects, leading to an increase in plasma homocysteine concentration. Vitamin B-6 and folate had little effect on plasma homocysteine concentration when individuals had adequate vitamin B-6 and folate status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan. ych@csmu.edu.twNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12638029

Citation

Huang, Yi-Chia, et al. "The Status of Plasma Homocysteine and Related B-vitamins in Healthy Young Vegetarians and Nonvegetarians." European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 42, no. 2, 2003, pp. 84-90.
Huang YC, Chang SJ, Chiu YT, et al. The status of plasma homocysteine and related B-vitamins in healthy young vegetarians and nonvegetarians. Eur J Nutr. 2003;42(2):84-90.
Huang, Y. C., Chang, S. J., Chiu, Y. T., Chang, H. H., & Cheng, C. H. (2003). The status of plasma homocysteine and related B-vitamins in healthy young vegetarians and nonvegetarians. European Journal of Nutrition, 42(2), pp. 84-90.
Huang YC, et al. The Status of Plasma Homocysteine and Related B-vitamins in Healthy Young Vegetarians and Nonvegetarians. Eur J Nutr. 2003;42(2):84-90. PubMed PMID: 12638029.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The status of plasma homocysteine and related B-vitamins in healthy young vegetarians and nonvegetarians. AU - Huang,Yi-Chia, AU - Chang,Sue-Joan, AU - Chiu,Yu-Ting, AU - Chang,Han-Hsin, AU - Cheng,Chien-Hsiang, PY - 2003/3/15/pubmed PY - 2003/12/3/medline PY - 2003/3/15/entrez SP - 84 EP - 90 JF - European journal of nutrition JO - Eur J Nutr VL - 42 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Exclusion of animal products and having only plant protein in vegetarian diets may affect the status of certain B-vitamins, and further cause the elevation of plasma homocysteine concentration. AIM: The purpose of this study was to assess the status of homocysteine and related B-vitamins in vegetarians and nonvegetarians. The effects of biochemical parameters of B-vitamins and dietary protein on plasma homocysteine were also examined. METHODS: The study was performed at the Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, in the central part of Taiwan. Thirty-seven vegetarians (28.9 +/- 5.5 y) and 32 nonvegetarians (22.9 +/- 1.6 y) were recruited. Nutrient intake was recorded using 3-day dietary records. Fasting venous blood samples were obtained. Plasma homocysteine, folate and vitamin B-12 were measured. Vitamin B-6 status was assessed by direct measures [plasma pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and urinary 4-pyridoxic acid (4-PA)] and indirect measures [erythrocyte alanine (EALT-AC) and aspartate (EAST-AC) aminotransaminase activity coefficient]. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in vitamin B-6 intake between the two groups, although the vegetarian group had a significantly lower vitamin B-12 intake than the nonvegetarian group. Vegetarian subjects had significantly lower mean plasma PLP and vitamin B-12 concentrations than did nonvegetarian subjects (p < 0.05); however, a significantly higher mean plasma folate concentration was found in the vegetarian group. Vegetarian subjects had a significantly higher mean plasma homocysteine concentration than nonvegetarian subjects (13.2 +/- 7.9 vs. 9.8 +/- 2.2 micromol/L). Negative correlations were seen between plasma homocysteine and vitamin B-12 concentrations in the vegetarian (p = 0.004), nonvegetarian (p = 0.026), and pooled (p < 0.001) groups. From best subsets regression analyses, the plasma homocysteine concentration could be significantly predicted by total protein intake (p = 0.027) and plasma vitamin B-12 concentration (p = 0.005) in the pooled group. When the intake of protein is not considered, vitamin B-12 concentration is still a strong predictor of plasma homocysteine concentration (p = 0.012). CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin B-12 intake and mean plasma vitamin B-12 concentration were lower for vegetarian subjects than for nonvegetarian subjects, leading to an increase in plasma homocysteine concentration. Vitamin B-6 and folate had little effect on plasma homocysteine concentration when individuals had adequate vitamin B-6 and folate status. SN - 1436-6207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12638029/The_status_of_plasma_homocysteine_and_related_B_vitamins_in_healthy_young_vegetarians_and_nonvegetarians_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-003-0387-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -