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Association between inherited thrombophilias, antiphospholipid antibodies, and lipoprotein A levels and venous thromboembolism in pregnancy.
Am J Perinatol. 2003 Jan; 20(1):17-24.AJ

Abstract

The objective of this study is to evaluate the association between venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pregnancy with thrombophilic factors. Thirty pregnant women with VTE were compared with 30 pregnant women matched by age and race without VTE and evaluated for risk factors and thrombophilia. Statistical analysis used two-tailed Fisher's exact test. VTE distribution was 30% in first trimester, 9% in 2nd trimester, 26% in 3rd trimester and 35% postpartum. Seventeen (57%) of VTE cases versus 2 (7%) of control cases had specific thrombophilia diagnosis (p <0.001). The results were: Factor V Leiden mutation (27 vs. 3%) p = 0.026, MTHFR homozygous 677 mutation (10 vs. 44%) p = 0.017, prothrombin gene mutation (11 vs. 0%), protein C deficiency (7 vs. 0%), antiphospholipid antibodies (27 vs. 3%) p = 0.026, mean lipoprotein levels 49 versus 23 mg/dL, p = 0.008, mean homocysteine levels 7.8 versus 7.1 umol/L. An association is suggested between thromboembolic events in pregnancy and thrombophilia, especially Factor V Leiden gene mutation and elevated antiphospholipid antibodies. A new finding is the association of elevated lipoprotein A levels with thromboembolic events in pregnancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Perinatology Unit, Morristown Memorial Hospital, New Jersey, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12638077

Citation

Ogunyemi, Dotun, et al. "Association Between Inherited Thrombophilias, Antiphospholipid Antibodies, and Lipoprotein a Levels and Venous Thromboembolism in Pregnancy." American Journal of Perinatology, vol. 20, no. 1, 2003, pp. 17-24.
Ogunyemi D, Cuellar F, Ku W, et al. Association between inherited thrombophilias, antiphospholipid antibodies, and lipoprotein A levels and venous thromboembolism in pregnancy. Am J Perinatol. 2003;20(1):17-24.
Ogunyemi, D., Cuellar, F., Ku, W., & Arkel, Y. (2003). Association between inherited thrombophilias, antiphospholipid antibodies, and lipoprotein A levels and venous thromboembolism in pregnancy. American Journal of Perinatology, 20(1), 17-24.
Ogunyemi D, et al. Association Between Inherited Thrombophilias, Antiphospholipid Antibodies, and Lipoprotein a Levels and Venous Thromboembolism in Pregnancy. Am J Perinatol. 2003;20(1):17-24. PubMed PMID: 12638077.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between inherited thrombophilias, antiphospholipid antibodies, and lipoprotein A levels and venous thromboembolism in pregnancy. AU - Ogunyemi,Dotun, AU - Cuellar,Francisco, AU - Ku,Wayne, AU - Arkel,Yale, PY - 2003/3/15/pubmed PY - 2003/7/4/medline PY - 2003/3/15/entrez SP - 17 EP - 24 JF - American journal of perinatology JO - Am J Perinatol VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - The objective of this study is to evaluate the association between venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pregnancy with thrombophilic factors. Thirty pregnant women with VTE were compared with 30 pregnant women matched by age and race without VTE and evaluated for risk factors and thrombophilia. Statistical analysis used two-tailed Fisher's exact test. VTE distribution was 30% in first trimester, 9% in 2nd trimester, 26% in 3rd trimester and 35% postpartum. Seventeen (57%) of VTE cases versus 2 (7%) of control cases had specific thrombophilia diagnosis (p <0.001). The results were: Factor V Leiden mutation (27 vs. 3%) p = 0.026, MTHFR homozygous 677 mutation (10 vs. 44%) p = 0.017, prothrombin gene mutation (11 vs. 0%), protein C deficiency (7 vs. 0%), antiphospholipid antibodies (27 vs. 3%) p = 0.026, mean lipoprotein levels 49 versus 23 mg/dL, p = 0.008, mean homocysteine levels 7.8 versus 7.1 umol/L. An association is suggested between thromboembolic events in pregnancy and thrombophilia, especially Factor V Leiden gene mutation and elevated antiphospholipid antibodies. A new finding is the association of elevated lipoprotein A levels with thromboembolic events in pregnancy. SN - 0735-1631 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12638077/Association_between_inherited_thrombophilias_antiphospholipid_antibodies_and_lipoprotein_A_levels_and_venous_thromboembolism_in_pregnancy_ L2 - https://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2003-37947 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -