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Early identification and management of critical incident stress.
Crit Care Nurse. 2003 Feb; 23(1):59-65.CC

Abstract

Everyone experiences stress. That stress may be related to work (internal), community (external), or family; it may be cumulative or related to a particular critical incident. The cost related to treating acute stress is staggering, both to individuals and to organizations. Critical care nurses are well educated in the physiological responses to the stress of acute illness. Recognizing the emotional impact of stress and the techniques to manage it in themselves and in those with whom they work is equally as important. CISD is widely advocated as an intervention after critical incidents. Although debriefing in and of itself is effective, a single-session semistructured crisis intervention will not prevent posttraumatic stress; thus, the use of CISD as part of a comprehensive multifaceted approach to the management of acute stress related to a critical incident is recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

California State University, Los Angeles, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12640960

Citation

Caine, Randy M., and Levon Ter-Bagdasarian. "Early Identification and Management of Critical Incident Stress." Critical Care Nurse, vol. 23, no. 1, 2003, pp. 59-65.
Caine RM, Ter-Bagdasarian L. Early identification and management of critical incident stress. Crit Care Nurse. 2003;23(1):59-65.
Caine, R. M., & Ter-Bagdasarian, L. (2003). Early identification and management of critical incident stress. Critical Care Nurse, 23(1), 59-65.
Caine RM, Ter-Bagdasarian L. Early Identification and Management of Critical Incident Stress. Crit Care Nurse. 2003;23(1):59-65. PubMed PMID: 12640960.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early identification and management of critical incident stress. AU - Caine,Randy M, AU - Ter-Bagdasarian,Levon, PY - 2003/3/19/pubmed PY - 2003/4/5/medline PY - 2003/3/19/entrez SP - 59 EP - 65 JF - Critical care nurse JO - Crit Care Nurse VL - 23 IS - 1 N2 - Everyone experiences stress. That stress may be related to work (internal), community (external), or family; it may be cumulative or related to a particular critical incident. The cost related to treating acute stress is staggering, both to individuals and to organizations. Critical care nurses are well educated in the physiological responses to the stress of acute illness. Recognizing the emotional impact of stress and the techniques to manage it in themselves and in those with whom they work is equally as important. CISD is widely advocated as an intervention after critical incidents. Although debriefing in and of itself is effective, a single-session semistructured crisis intervention will not prevent posttraumatic stress; thus, the use of CISD as part of a comprehensive multifaceted approach to the management of acute stress related to a critical incident is recommended. SN - 0279-5442 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12640960/Early_identification_and_management_of_critical_incident_stress_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/posttraumaticstressdisorder.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -