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Manual therapy and exercise therapy in patients with chronic low back pain: a randomized, controlled trial with 1-year follow-up.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2003 Mar 15; 28(6):525-31; discussion 531-2.S

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN

A multicenter, randomized, controlled trial with 1-year follow-up.

OBJECTIVES

To compare the effect of manual therapy to exercise therapy in sick-listed patients with chronic low back pain (>8 wks).

SUMMARY AND BACKGROUND DATA

The effect of exercise therapy and manual therapy on chronic low back pain with respect to pain, function, and sick leave have been investigated in a number of studies. The results are, however, conflicting.

METHODS

Patients with chronic low back pain or radicular pain sick-listed for more than 8 weeks and less than 6 months were included. A total of 49 patients were randomized to either manual therapy (n = 27) or to exercise therapy (n = 22). Sixteen treatments were given over the course of 2 months. Pain intensity, functional disability (Oswestry disability index), general health (Dartmouth COOP function charts), and return to work were recorded before, immediately after, at 4 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after the treatment period. Spinal range of motion (Schober test) was measured before and immediately after the treatment period only.

RESULTS

Although significant improvements were observed in both groups, the manual therapy group showed significantly larger improvements than the exercise therapy group on all outcome variables throughout the entire experimental period. Immediately after the 2-month treatment period, 67% in the manual therapy and 27% in the exercise therapy group had returned to work (P < 0.01), a relative difference that was maintained throughout the follow-up period.

CONCLUSIONS

Improvements were found in both intervention groups, but manual therapy showed significantly greater improvement than exercise therapy in patients with chronic low back pain. The effects were reflected on all outcome measures, both on short and long-term follow-up.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Larvik Fysioterapi, Norway. auro@sensewave.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12642755

Citation

Aure, Olav Frode, et al. "Manual Therapy and Exercise Therapy in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: a Randomized, Controlled Trial With 1-year Follow-up." Spine, vol. 28, no. 6, 2003, pp. 525-31; discussion 531-2.
Aure OF, Nilsen JH, Vasseljen O. Manual therapy and exercise therapy in patients with chronic low back pain: a randomized, controlled trial with 1-year follow-up. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2003;28(6):525-31; discussion 531-2.
Aure, O. F., Nilsen, J. H., & Vasseljen, O. (2003). Manual therapy and exercise therapy in patients with chronic low back pain: a randomized, controlled trial with 1-year follow-up. Spine, 28(6), 525-31; discussion 531-2.
Aure OF, Nilsen JH, Vasseljen O. Manual Therapy and Exercise Therapy in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: a Randomized, Controlled Trial With 1-year Follow-up. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2003 Mar 15;28(6):525-31; discussion 531-2. PubMed PMID: 12642755.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Manual therapy and exercise therapy in patients with chronic low back pain: a randomized, controlled trial with 1-year follow-up. AU - Aure,Olav Frode, AU - Nilsen,Jens Hoel, AU - Vasseljen,Ottar, PY - 2003/3/19/pubmed PY - 2003/3/29/medline PY - 2003/3/19/entrez SP - 525-31; discussion 531-2 JF - Spine JO - Spine (Phila Pa 1976) VL - 28 IS - 6 N2 - STUDY DESIGN: A multicenter, randomized, controlled trial with 1-year follow-up. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of manual therapy to exercise therapy in sick-listed patients with chronic low back pain (>8 wks). SUMMARY AND BACKGROUND DATA: The effect of exercise therapy and manual therapy on chronic low back pain with respect to pain, function, and sick leave have been investigated in a number of studies. The results are, however, conflicting. METHODS: Patients with chronic low back pain or radicular pain sick-listed for more than 8 weeks and less than 6 months were included. A total of 49 patients were randomized to either manual therapy (n = 27) or to exercise therapy (n = 22). Sixteen treatments were given over the course of 2 months. Pain intensity, functional disability (Oswestry disability index), general health (Dartmouth COOP function charts), and return to work were recorded before, immediately after, at 4 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after the treatment period. Spinal range of motion (Schober test) was measured before and immediately after the treatment period only. RESULTS: Although significant improvements were observed in both groups, the manual therapy group showed significantly larger improvements than the exercise therapy group on all outcome variables throughout the entire experimental period. Immediately after the 2-month treatment period, 67% in the manual therapy and 27% in the exercise therapy group had returned to work (P < 0.01), a relative difference that was maintained throughout the follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: Improvements were found in both intervention groups, but manual therapy showed significantly greater improvement than exercise therapy in patients with chronic low back pain. The effects were reflected on all outcome measures, both on short and long-term follow-up. SN - 1528-1159 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12642755/Manual_therapy_and_exercise_therapy_in_patients_with_chronic_low_back_pain:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_with_1_year_follow_up_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.BRS.0000049921.04200.A6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -