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Mini-intervention for subacute low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2003 Mar 15; 28(6):533-40; discussion 540-1.S

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN

Randomized controlled trial.

OBJECTIVES

To investigate the effectiveness and costs of a mini-intervention, provided in addition to the usual care, and the incremental effect of a work site visit for patients with subacute disabling low back pain.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA

There is lack of data on cost-effectiveness of brief interventions for patients with prolonged low back pain.

METHODS

A total of 164 patients with subacute low back pain were randomized to a mini-intervention group (A), a work site visit group (B), or a usual care group (C). Groups A (n = 56) and B (n = 51) underwent one assessment by a physician plus a physiotherapist. Group B received a work site visit in addition. Group C served as controls (n = 57) and was treated in municipal primary health care. All patients received a leaflet on back pain. Pain, disability, specific and generic health-related quality of life, satisfaction with care, days on sick leave, and use and costs of health care consumption were measured at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups.

RESULTS

During follow-up, fewer subjects had daily pain in Groups A and B than in Group C (Group A Group C, = 0.002; Group B Group C, = 0.030). In Group A, pain was less bothersome (Group A Group C, = 0.032) and interfered less with daily life (Group A Group C, = 0.040) than among controls. Average days on sick leave were 19 in Group A, 28 in Group B, and 41 in Group C (Group A Group C, = 0.019). Treatment satisfaction was better in the intervention groups than among the controls, and costs were lowest in the mini-intervention group.

CONCLUSIONS

Mini-intervention reduced daily back pain symptoms and sickness absence, improved adaptation to pain and patient satisfaction among patients with subacute low back pain, without increasing health care costs. A work site visit did not increase effectiveness.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Occupational Medicine, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. kaija.karjalainen@occuphealth.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12642757

Citation

Karjalainen, Kaija, et al. "Mini-intervention for Subacute Low Back Pain: a Randomized Controlled Trial." Spine, vol. 28, no. 6, 2003, pp. 533-40; discussion 540-1.
Karjalainen K, Malmivaara A, Pohjolainen T, et al. Mini-intervention for subacute low back pain: a randomized controlled trial. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2003;28(6):533-40; discussion 540-1.
Karjalainen, K., Malmivaara, A., Pohjolainen, T., Hurri, H., Mutanen, P., Rissanen, P., Pahkajärvi, H., Levon, H., Karpoff, H., & Roine, R. (2003). Mini-intervention for subacute low back pain: a randomized controlled trial. Spine, 28(6), 533-40; discussion 540-1.
Karjalainen K, et al. Mini-intervention for Subacute Low Back Pain: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2003 Mar 15;28(6):533-40; discussion 540-1. PubMed PMID: 12642757.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mini-intervention for subacute low back pain: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Karjalainen,Kaija, AU - Malmivaara,Antti, AU - Pohjolainen,Timo, AU - Hurri,Heikki, AU - Mutanen,Pertti, AU - Rissanen,Pekka, AU - Pahkajärvi,Helena, AU - Levon,Heikki, AU - Karpoff,Hanna, AU - Roine,Risto, PY - 2003/3/19/pubmed PY - 2003/3/29/medline PY - 2003/3/19/entrez SP - 533-40; discussion 540-1 JF - Spine JO - Spine (Phila Pa 1976) VL - 28 IS - 6 N2 - STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effectiveness and costs of a mini-intervention, provided in addition to the usual care, and the incremental effect of a work site visit for patients with subacute disabling low back pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: There is lack of data on cost-effectiveness of brief interventions for patients with prolonged low back pain. METHODS: A total of 164 patients with subacute low back pain were randomized to a mini-intervention group (A), a work site visit group (B), or a usual care group (C). Groups A (n = 56) and B (n = 51) underwent one assessment by a physician plus a physiotherapist. Group B received a work site visit in addition. Group C served as controls (n = 57) and was treated in municipal primary health care. All patients received a leaflet on back pain. Pain, disability, specific and generic health-related quality of life, satisfaction with care, days on sick leave, and use and costs of health care consumption were measured at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. RESULTS: During follow-up, fewer subjects had daily pain in Groups A and B than in Group C (Group A Group C, = 0.002; Group B Group C, = 0.030). In Group A, pain was less bothersome (Group A Group C, = 0.032) and interfered less with daily life (Group A Group C, = 0.040) than among controls. Average days on sick leave were 19 in Group A, 28 in Group B, and 41 in Group C (Group A Group C, = 0.019). Treatment satisfaction was better in the intervention groups than among the controls, and costs were lowest in the mini-intervention group. CONCLUSIONS: Mini-intervention reduced daily back pain symptoms and sickness absence, improved adaptation to pain and patient satisfaction among patients with subacute low back pain, without increasing health care costs. A work site visit did not increase effectiveness. SN - 1528-1159 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12642757/Mini_intervention_for_subacute_low_back_pain:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.BRS.0000049928.52520.69 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -