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Campylobacter spp in human, chickens, pigs and their antimicrobial resistance.

Abstract

Campylobacter spp. have been identified as etiologic agents in outbreaks and sporadic cases of gastroenteritis in developed countries. In developing countries, most reported Campylobacter infections are in children. Previously reported prevalences of Campylobacter spp. in children in Southeast Asia range from 2.9% to 15%. The frequency and pattern of occurrence of Campylobacter spp. differ between developed and developing countries, especially in the number of cases reported in adults and the presence of any seasonal patterns in occurrence. Although the severity of Campylobacter infection in adults was different between developed and developing countries, the clinical symptoms of infection in adults resulting from infection in developing countries was similar to those in developed countries. Many different animal species maintain Campylobacter spp. with no clinical signs. There do not appear to be significantly different colonization rates of Campylobacter in food animals between developed and developing countries. The role of C. jejuni as a primary pathogen in farm animals is uncertain. C. jejuni can be found in feces of diarrheic and healthy calves and piglets. Campylobacter with resistance to antimicrobial agents have been reported in both developed and developing countries, and the situation seems to deteriorate more rapidly in developing countries, where there is widespread and uncontrolled use of antibiotics resistance was observed at high levels in food animals in both developed and developing countries. Studies suggested an association between antimicrobial use in food animals and the development of resistance in human isolates in developed countries.

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Authors+Show Affiliations

,

Population Medicine Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314, USA.

Source

MeSH

Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Campylobacter
Campylobacter Infections
Chickens
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Food Microbiology
Humans
Swine

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12655109

Citation

Padungton, Pawin, and John B. Kaneene. "Campylobacter Spp in Human, Chickens, Pigs and Their Antimicrobial Resistance." The Journal of Veterinary Medical Science, vol. 65, no. 2, 2003, pp. 161-70.
Padungton P, Kaneene JB. Campylobacter spp in human, chickens, pigs and their antimicrobial resistance. J Vet Med Sci. 2003;65(2):161-70.
Padungton, P., & Kaneene, J. B. (2003). Campylobacter spp in human, chickens, pigs and their antimicrobial resistance. The Journal of Veterinary Medical Science, 65(2), pp. 161-70.
Padungton P, Kaneene JB. Campylobacter Spp in Human, Chickens, Pigs and Their Antimicrobial Resistance. J Vet Med Sci. 2003;65(2):161-70. PubMed PMID: 12655109.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Campylobacter spp in human, chickens, pigs and their antimicrobial resistance. AU - Padungton,Pawin, AU - Kaneene,John B, PY - 2003/3/26/pubmed PY - 2003/8/9/medline PY - 2003/3/26/entrez SP - 161 EP - 70 JF - The Journal of veterinary medical science JO - J. Vet. Med. Sci. VL - 65 IS - 2 N2 - Campylobacter spp. have been identified as etiologic agents in outbreaks and sporadic cases of gastroenteritis in developed countries. In developing countries, most reported Campylobacter infections are in children. Previously reported prevalences of Campylobacter spp. in children in Southeast Asia range from 2.9% to 15%. The frequency and pattern of occurrence of Campylobacter spp. differ between developed and developing countries, especially in the number of cases reported in adults and the presence of any seasonal patterns in occurrence. Although the severity of Campylobacter infection in adults was different between developed and developing countries, the clinical symptoms of infection in adults resulting from infection in developing countries was similar to those in developed countries. Many different animal species maintain Campylobacter spp. with no clinical signs. There do not appear to be significantly different colonization rates of Campylobacter in food animals between developed and developing countries. The role of C. jejuni as a primary pathogen in farm animals is uncertain. C. jejuni can be found in feces of diarrheic and healthy calves and piglets. Campylobacter with resistance to antimicrobial agents have been reported in both developed and developing countries, and the situation seems to deteriorate more rapidly in developing countries, where there is widespread and uncontrolled use of antibiotics resistance was observed at high levels in food animals in both developed and developing countries. Studies suggested an association between antimicrobial use in food animals and the development of resistance in human isolates in developed countries. SN - 0916-7250 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12655109/full_citation L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/antibioticresistance.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -