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A randomized controlled trial of a probiotic, VSL#3, on gut transit and symptoms in diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2003; 17(7):895-904AP

Abstract

AIM

To investigate the effects of a probiotic formulation, VSL#3, on gastrointestinal transit and symptoms of patients with Rome II irritable bowel syndrome with predominant diarrhoea.

METHODS

Twenty-five patients with diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome were randomly assigned to receive VSL#3 powder (450 billion lyophilized bacteria/day) or matching placebo twice daily for 8 weeks after a 2-week run-in period. Pre- and post-treatment gastrointestinal transit measurements were performed in all patients. Patients recorded their bowel function and symptoms daily in a diary during the 10-week study, which was powered to detect a 50% change in the primary colonic transit end-point.

RESULTS

There were no significant differences in mean gastrointestinal transit measurements, bowel function scores or satisfactory global symptom relief between the two treatment groups, pre- or post-therapy. Differences in abdominal bloating scores between treatments were borderline significant (P = 0.09, analysis of covariance). Further analysis revealed that abdominal bloating was reduced (P = 0.046) with VSL#3 [mean post- minus pre-treatment score, - 13.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), - 2.5 to - 24.9], but not with placebo (P = 0.54) (mean post- minus pre-treatment score, - 1.7; 95% CI, 7.1 to - 10.4). With the exception of changes in abdominal bloating, VSL#3 had no effect on other individual symptoms: abdominal pain, gas and urgency. All patients tolerated VSL#3 well.

CONCLUSION

VSL#3 appears to be promising in the relief of abdominal bloating in patients with diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. This is unrelated to an alteration in gastrointestinal or colonic transit.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical Enteric Neuroscience Translational & Epidemiological Research Program, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12656692

Citation

Kim, H J., et al. "A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Probiotic, VSL#3, On Gut Transit and Symptoms in Diarrhoea-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 17, no. 7, 2003, pp. 895-904.
Kim HJ, Camilleri M, McKinzie S, et al. A randomized controlled trial of a probiotic, VSL#3, on gut transit and symptoms in diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2003;17(7):895-904.
Kim, H. J., Camilleri, M., McKinzie, S., Lempke, M. B., Burton, D. D., Thomforde, G. M., & Zinsmeister, A. R. (2003). A randomized controlled trial of a probiotic, VSL#3, on gut transit and symptoms in diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 17(7), pp. 895-904.
Kim HJ, et al. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Probiotic, VSL#3, On Gut Transit and Symptoms in Diarrhoea-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2003 Apr 1;17(7):895-904. PubMed PMID: 12656692.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A randomized controlled trial of a probiotic, VSL#3, on gut transit and symptoms in diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. AU - Kim,H J, AU - Camilleri,M, AU - McKinzie,S, AU - Lempke,M B, AU - Burton,D D, AU - Thomforde,G M, AU - Zinsmeister,A R, PY - 2003/3/27/pubmed PY - 2003/6/24/medline PY - 2003/3/27/entrez SP - 895 EP - 904 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 17 IS - 7 N2 - AIM: To investigate the effects of a probiotic formulation, VSL#3, on gastrointestinal transit and symptoms of patients with Rome II irritable bowel syndrome with predominant diarrhoea. METHODS: Twenty-five patients with diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome were randomly assigned to receive VSL#3 powder (450 billion lyophilized bacteria/day) or matching placebo twice daily for 8 weeks after a 2-week run-in period. Pre- and post-treatment gastrointestinal transit measurements were performed in all patients. Patients recorded their bowel function and symptoms daily in a diary during the 10-week study, which was powered to detect a 50% change in the primary colonic transit end-point. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in mean gastrointestinal transit measurements, bowel function scores or satisfactory global symptom relief between the two treatment groups, pre- or post-therapy. Differences in abdominal bloating scores between treatments were borderline significant (P = 0.09, analysis of covariance). Further analysis revealed that abdominal bloating was reduced (P = 0.046) with VSL#3 [mean post- minus pre-treatment score, - 13.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), - 2.5 to - 24.9], but not with placebo (P = 0.54) (mean post- minus pre-treatment score, - 1.7; 95% CI, 7.1 to - 10.4). With the exception of changes in abdominal bloating, VSL#3 had no effect on other individual symptoms: abdominal pain, gas and urgency. All patients tolerated VSL#3 well. CONCLUSION: VSL#3 appears to be promising in the relief of abdominal bloating in patients with diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. This is unrelated to an alteration in gastrointestinal or colonic transit. SN - 0269-2813 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12656692/A_randomized_controlled_trial_of_a_probiotic_VSL L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0269-2813&date=2003&volume=17&issue=7&spage=895 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -