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The diet factor in pediatric and adolescent migraine.
Pediatr Neurol 2003; 28(1):9-15PN

Abstract

Diet can play an important role in the precipitation of headaches in children and adolescents with migraine. The diet factor in pediatric migraine is frequently neglected in favor of preventive drug therapy. The list of foods, beverages, and additives that trigger migraine includes cheese, chocolate, citrus fruits, hot dogs, monosodium glutamate, aspartame, fatty foods, ice cream, caffeine withdrawal, and alcoholic drinks, especially red wine and beer. Underage drinking is a significant potential cause of recurrent headache in today's adolescent patients. Tyramine, phenylethylamine, histamine, nitrites, and sulfites are involved in the mechanism of food intolerance headache. Immunoglobulin E-mediated food allergy is an infrequent cause. Dietary triggers affect phases of the migraine process by influencing release of serotonin and norepinephrine, causing vasoconstriction or vasodilatation, or by direct stimulation of trigeminal ganglia, brainstem, and cortical neuronal pathways. Treatment begins with a headache and diet diary and the selective avoidance of foods presumed to trigger attacks. A universal migraine diet with simultaneous elimination of all potential food triggers is generally not advised in practice. A well-balanced diet is encouraged, with avoidance of fasting or skipped meals. Long-term prophylactic drug therapy is appropriate only after exclusion of headache-precipitating trigger factors, including dietary factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Neurology, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois 60614, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12657413

Citation

Millichap, J Gordon, and Michelle M. Yee. "The Diet Factor in Pediatric and Adolescent Migraine." Pediatric Neurology, vol. 28, no. 1, 2003, pp. 9-15.
Millichap JG, Yee MM. The diet factor in pediatric and adolescent migraine. Pediatr Neurol. 2003;28(1):9-15.
Millichap, J. G., & Yee, M. M. (2003). The diet factor in pediatric and adolescent migraine. Pediatric Neurology, 28(1), pp. 9-15.
Millichap JG, Yee MM. The Diet Factor in Pediatric and Adolescent Migraine. Pediatr Neurol. 2003;28(1):9-15. PubMed PMID: 12657413.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The diet factor in pediatric and adolescent migraine. AU - Millichap,J Gordon, AU - Yee,Michelle M, PY - 2003/3/27/pubmed PY - 2003/5/13/medline PY - 2003/3/27/entrez SP - 9 EP - 15 JF - Pediatric neurology JO - Pediatr. Neurol. VL - 28 IS - 1 N2 - Diet can play an important role in the precipitation of headaches in children and adolescents with migraine. The diet factor in pediatric migraine is frequently neglected in favor of preventive drug therapy. The list of foods, beverages, and additives that trigger migraine includes cheese, chocolate, citrus fruits, hot dogs, monosodium glutamate, aspartame, fatty foods, ice cream, caffeine withdrawal, and alcoholic drinks, especially red wine and beer. Underage drinking is a significant potential cause of recurrent headache in today's adolescent patients. Tyramine, phenylethylamine, histamine, nitrites, and sulfites are involved in the mechanism of food intolerance headache. Immunoglobulin E-mediated food allergy is an infrequent cause. Dietary triggers affect phases of the migraine process by influencing release of serotonin and norepinephrine, causing vasoconstriction or vasodilatation, or by direct stimulation of trigeminal ganglia, brainstem, and cortical neuronal pathways. Treatment begins with a headache and diet diary and the selective avoidance of foods presumed to trigger attacks. A universal migraine diet with simultaneous elimination of all potential food triggers is generally not advised in practice. A well-balanced diet is encouraged, with avoidance of fasting or skipped meals. Long-term prophylactic drug therapy is appropriate only after exclusion of headache-precipitating trigger factors, including dietary factors. SN - 0887-8994 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12657413/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0887899402004666 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -