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Antireflux surgery for Barrett's oesophagus.
ANZ J Surg 2003; 73(4):234-6AJ

Abstract

Barrett's oesophagus is usually the result of severe reflux disease. Relief of reflux symptoms is the primary aim of treatment in patients with Barrett's oesophagus who do not have high-grade dysplasia. Some studies with medium-term (2-5 years) follow up show that antireflux surgery can provide good or excellent symptom control, with normal oesophageal acid exposure, in more than 90% of patients with Barrett's oesophagus. Antireflux surgery, but not medical therapy, can also reduce duodenal nonacid reflux to normal levels. There is no conclusive evidence that antireflux surgery can prevent the development of dysplasia or cancer, or that it can reliably induce regression of dysplasia, and patients with Barrett's oesophagus should therefore remain in a surveillance programme after operation. Some data suggest that antireflux surgery can prevent the development of intestinal metaplasia (IM) in patients with reflux disease but no IM. The combination of antireflux surgery plus an endoscopic ablation procedure is a promising treatment for patients with Barrett's oesophagus with low-grade dysplasia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. rlord@hsc.usc.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12662234

Citation

Lord, Reginald V N.. "Antireflux Surgery for Barrett's Oesophagus." ANZ Journal of Surgery, vol. 73, no. 4, 2003, pp. 234-6.
Lord RV. Antireflux surgery for Barrett's oesophagus. ANZ J Surg. 2003;73(4):234-6.
Lord, R. V. (2003). Antireflux surgery for Barrett's oesophagus. ANZ Journal of Surgery, 73(4), pp. 234-6.
Lord RV. Antireflux Surgery for Barrett's Oesophagus. ANZ J Surg. 2003;73(4):234-6. PubMed PMID: 12662234.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antireflux surgery for Barrett's oesophagus. A1 - Lord,Reginald V N, PY - 2003/3/29/pubmed PY - 2003/9/23/medline PY - 2003/3/29/entrez SP - 234 EP - 6 JF - ANZ journal of surgery JO - ANZ J Surg VL - 73 IS - 4 N2 - Barrett's oesophagus is usually the result of severe reflux disease. Relief of reflux symptoms is the primary aim of treatment in patients with Barrett's oesophagus who do not have high-grade dysplasia. Some studies with medium-term (2-5 years) follow up show that antireflux surgery can provide good or excellent symptom control, with normal oesophageal acid exposure, in more than 90% of patients with Barrett's oesophagus. Antireflux surgery, but not medical therapy, can also reduce duodenal nonacid reflux to normal levels. There is no conclusive evidence that antireflux surgery can prevent the development of dysplasia or cancer, or that it can reliably induce regression of dysplasia, and patients with Barrett's oesophagus should therefore remain in a surveillance programme after operation. Some data suggest that antireflux surgery can prevent the development of intestinal metaplasia (IM) in patients with reflux disease but no IM. The combination of antireflux surgery plus an endoscopic ablation procedure is a promising treatment for patients with Barrett's oesophagus with low-grade dysplasia. SN - 1445-1433 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12662234/Antireflux_surgery_for_Barrett's_oesophagus_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=1445-1433&date=2003&volume=73&issue=4&spage=234 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -